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ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 

1989 



IN MEMORIAM 

Edward DeSaulnier 

1921-1989 

Town Moderator 

Town Counsel 

State Representative 

Gerald J. Lannan 

1921-1989 

Board of Selectmen 
1966-1975 



Cover Photo by Jean Sougnez 

Student Prints: David Koshiol (Monument); Brian Rea (Cemetery); Fred Breusseau (Church) 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1989 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1989: 

Assessed Valuation Rate 1989 

Tax Rate: 



United States Senators in Congress: 

5 th Congressional District 

State Senator 



Representative in General Court 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. 

It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 

Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,866 

$2,379,037,369 (Real Estate) 

$36,102,597 (Personal Property) 

$22.15 

($10.70 Residential — $11.45 Commercial) 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord 

Carol C. Amick, Bedford (resigned November 

1989) 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 

Last Monday in April 

7:00 p.m. -every other Monday 

7:30 p.m. -every other Tuesday 

7:30 p.m.-2nd & 4th Wed. of month 

7:30 p.m.-4th Thursday 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tuesdays 

7:00 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 



9 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



CHELMSFORD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Front Row: (left to right) Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman; Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 
Second Row: (left to right) Bradford O. Emerson; Roger A. Blomgren; Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



TOWN MANAGER 



The Board of Selectmen held their 1989 re- 
organizational meeting on Wednesday, April 5, 1989 follow- 
ing the Annual Town Election in which Selectmen Dennis 
J. Ready and Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. were both re-elected 
for three year terms. Mr. Johnson was voted Chairman of 
the Board, Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman and Mr. Ready 
Clerk. Bradford O. Emerson and Mr. Blomgren are the 
other two members. 

Chelmsford's first Charter was voted in on April 4th, and 
the first task of the Board of Selectmen was to appoint a 
Town Manager Screening Committee. This was done on 
April 18th, with the following persons appointed: Barry 
Balan, John Carson, Thomas Cobery, Eileen Duffy, B. Jay 
Finnegan, Joan Gauthier, George Simonian, Max Ward 
and Thomas Welch. 

The committee put in many long, hard hours of work 
in narrowing 72 applicants for the Town Manager's job 
down to three finalists. Chairman Balan told the Board 
on August 21st that they feel any one of the three is well 
qualified. After interviewing the three finalists, the Board 
appointed Bernard F. Lynch, Executive Secretary, as 
Chelmsford's first Town Manager on September 11, 1990. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Northern 
Middlesex Area Commission, the Middlesex County Ad- 
visory Board and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. 
Individual Selectmen also served as liaisons between the 
Board of Selectmen and various town and regional boards 
and commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board of 
Selectmen maintained regular contact with Congressman 
Atkins' office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and State 
Representative Carol Cleven. Senator Amick resigned in 
the Fall, and the Board wished her well in her new posi- 
tion and thanked her for her years of dedicated service 
representing the Town of Chelmsford. The Selectmen wish 
to express their gratitude to Congressman Atkins and 
Representative Cleven for their help and cooperation dur- 
ing the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their gratitude to the various 
Town boards and committees for their accomplishments 
during the year. It should be remembered that these boards 
and committees are composed of unpaid volunteers who 
take many long hours out of their free time to work on issues 
and projects that benefit the Town of Chelmsford. The 
Board would also like to recognize our competent and 
dedicated office staff of Mrs. Judith Carter, Mrs. Beth Kin- 
ney and Mrs. Marian Currier. 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson, Member 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 



Dear Citizens of Chelmsford: 

It is with great pride that I file the first Town Manager 
Annual Report for the Town of Chelmsford. Surely one of 
the most important events of 1989 was the passage of the 
Chelmsford Home Rule Charter in April of 1989, the subse- 
quent election of the first Town Meeting Representatives 
and the appointment of the first Town Manager. I am 
proud to have been selected Town Manager and am anx- 
ious to serve the citizens of Chelmsford and improve the 
quality of services that are delivered by the Town as well 
as the manner in which the local government manages its 
resources. 

The year 1989 had other high and low points worthy of 
attention. The Town did embark upon a bi-weekly curb- 
side recycling program that is designed to reduce costs as 
well as promote environmental protection. The program 
is not designed to be a money maker in its first year of 
operation; however, as trash tipping fees continue to 
escalate and new recycling markets develop the Town 
should realize cost savings by year two or three of the 
program. 

In October the new Senior Center on Groton Road 
opened its doors for the first time and stands as an exam- 
ple of hard work and volunteerism. The new facility pro- 
vides ample space for all of the Senior activities that cur- 
rently exist and those that will be needed or wanted in the 
future. The nearly $2 million project was exempted from 
the constraints of Proposition 2V6 and will be paid by 1993. 

The Town also moved ahead in 1989 in meeting its af- 
fordable housing needs with the groundbreaking for The 
Commons (now known as The Courtyard) at the old Route 
110 Chelmsford Drive-In site. This 168 unit condominium 
development will provide needed housing opportunities to 
a variety of populations, including 50 first time home- 
buyers. The Town has made great strides in addressing 
affordable housing; however, environmental concerns re- 
quired denial of another affordable housing project on 
Richardson Road. The subsequent decision by the Massa- 
chusetts Housing Appeals Committee to grant this project 
a permit to proceed resulted in a legal appeal by the Town 
to the judicial system. As of this date the courts have not 
heard the case. 

The most pressing and distressing occurrence of 1989 was 
the withholding by the Governor of local aid funds that, 
for Chelmsford, totalled nearly $1.2 million. The timing 
of this was the most disturbing as the Town was already 
one month into the FY90 Budget. In order to balance the 
Budget a Special Town Meeting was required in October 
to make the necessary cuts in the School and Town Depart- 
ments. The cuts reflected reduced services and increased 
belt tightening. 

The Special Town Meeting also utilized available funds 
to fund a new teachers' contract as well as the long 
negotiated Fire Union contract. I am hopeful the Fire set- 
tlement closed this chapter of tense Fire/Town relations. 



Much of my time after being appointed Town Manager 
was focused on implementing the various components of 
the Charter and the Charter itself. Primary of the changes 
brought by the Charter was the consolidation of various 
public works commissions, boards and departments into 
one Department of Public Works. Recognizing talent within 
the existing organization, I appointed the Town Engineer 
James Pearson as the Director of the D.P.W. in October of 
1989. This new department will improve services and cost 
effectiveness as there is better coordination of effort, in- 
creased planning of work and less duplication. 

Other Charter induced or management related initiatives 
begun in 1989 include a multi-year fiscal forecast, centraliz- 
ed purchasing and personnel systems, performance based 
compensation, inventory of Town assets, master plan, infra- 
structure maintenance plans and overall changes in the 
organizational culture so as to promote excellence in ser- 
vice delivery. This latter initiative includes promotion of 
the citizen as a customer deserving of respectful service and 
accessibility. To this end I have tried to make myself ac- 
cessible through regular office hours to citizens so as to help 
them solve whatever problems they might have, or receive 
their input and ideas. I look to the employees and the 
citizens of the Town for innovative solutions to the problems 
that face us. 



The upcoming year of 1990 will produce more challenges 
as the initiatives of 1989 move forward. During the upcom- 
ing year we will also grapple with aditional financial woes 
as State Aid decreases or levels off, property growth slows, 
miscellaneous receipts decrease and reserves are exhausted. 
These downward trends in revenues require finding new 
sources of funds, decreased services or new methods of ser- 
vice delivery. The preferred means of maintaining services 
within existing resources is restructuring of departments, 
elimination of unneeded personnal and downsizing of the 
least used services. These actions, however, are not done 
without difficulty as people resist change, oppose reduc- 
tions or seek to unrealistically keep all services, great and 
small. In short, difficult times and decisions lie ahead as 
some want and others resist organizational change at all 
costs. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, the 
office staff of Judy Carter, Marian Currier and Beth Kin- 
ney, all of the Department Heads and Town employees and 
the citizens of the Town for their help and support over 
the past year. I look forward to working with all of you in 
1990. 

Respectfully Yours, 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Town Manager 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Assistant Town Clerk 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 
Licenses 

3027 

Deaths 
188 


Kennel 
Licenses 

9 

Marriages 
311 


Recorded 
Mortgages 


1452 
Births inc. 


802 
Intentions 


374 


308 



WARRANT FOR THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 4, 1989 and April 24, 1989 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2. Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3. Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafeteria 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 8. McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On, Tuesday, the fourth (4th) day of April, 1989, being 
the first Tuesday in said month, at 7:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers and 
questions: 

Two Selectmen for three years; One Assessor for three 
years; One Cemetery Commissioner for three years; One 
Member of Board of Health for three years; One Park Com- 
missioner for three years; One Sewer Commissioner for 
three years; One Sewer Commissioner unexpired, one year 
term to fill vacancy; Two Members of Public Library 
Trustees for three years; One Constable for three years; Two 
Members of School Committee for three years; Two Plan- 
ning Board Members for three years. 

Question 1. Shall the Town of Chelmsford approve the 
new charter recommended by the charter commission sum- 
marized below? 



Summary: If adopted the proposed charter would: 
establish a 162 member representative town meeting, 
18 representatives elected for terms of three years each 
from each of the town's 9 precincts; establish the of- 
fice of town manager, with responsibility for daily 
management of the town's business; provide for the 
election by the voters of a five member board of select- 
men, the moderator, a five member school commit- 
tee, a seven member planning board, a three member 
board of health, a seven member board of library 
trustees, a three member cemetery commission, a five 
member sewer commission, the housing authority and 
the constable; provide for strengthened financial pro- 
cedures, the creation of a department of public works 
and flexibility to reorganize town agencies in the 
future; provide for the right of voters to recall elected 
officials. 

Question 2. Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed 
to exempt from the provisions of Proposition two and one- 
half (2V6), so called, the amounts required to pay for the 
bonds to be issued in order to design and construct sewers, 
pump stations and force mains to complete the Town's 
Sewering Project to serve the Phase II and Phase III areas 
as defined in the Town's Facilities Plan for Wastewater 
management as amended dated August, 1986, and addi- 
tional "targeted need" areas; such amounts to be reduced 
by State and Federal grants that are made available for 
the projects? 



%s 
No 



The polls will be open from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium 
on Monday, the twenty-fourth (24th) day of April 1989, 
at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there to act 
upon the following Articles, Viz: 



\fes 
No 



♦indicates Candidate for re-election 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 4, 1989 



SELECTMAN (2) 3 yrs. 
Dennis J. Ready* 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr.* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 



1068 



Pet 2 



880 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



1014 



992 



1128 



1192 



1206 



1032 



Pet 9 



964 



Total 



329 


230 


288 


280 


347 


352 


369 


265 


287 


2747 


346 


282 


311 


311 


347 


390 


384 


319 


287 


2977 




















1 


4 





5 


393 


368 


415 


401 


434 


450 


452 


444 


390 


3747 



9476 



ASSESSOR 3 yrs. 
Ruth K. Delaney* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



396 
138 



534 



328 
112 



440 



370 
137 



507 



395 
101 



409 
155 



439 
157 



435 
168 



496 



564 



596 



603 



358 
158 



516 



337 
145 



482 



3467 
1271 



4738 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 yrs 

Gerald L. Hardy 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



375 
159 



534 



320 
120 



440 



346 
161 



507 



360 
136 



389 
175 



418 
178 



419 

184 



496 



564 



596 



603 



354 
162 



516 



325 
157 



482 



3306 
1432 



4738 



BOARD OF HEALTH 3 yrs 

Paul J. Canniff* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



375 
159 



534 



312 
128 



440 



364 
143 



507 



345 
151 



394 
170 



412 
184 



416 
187 



496 



564 



596 



603 



344 
172 



516 



331 
151 



482 



3293 
1445 



4738 



PARK COMMMISSIONER 3 yrs 

Eileen M. Duffy* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



369 
165 



534 



316 
124 



440 



359 
148 



507 



353 
143 



376 
188 



418 

178 



407 
196 



496 



564 



596 



603 



352 
164 



516 



336 
146 



482 



3286 
1452 



4738 



SEWER COMMISSIONER 3 yrs 

John P. Emerson, Jr.* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSIONER unexp 1 yr. 

Robert P. Joyce 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



373 


278 


329 


333 


363 


401 


382 


319 


305 


3083 























1 





1 


161 


162 


178 


163 


201 


195 


221 


196 


177 


1654 


534 


440 


507 


496 


564 


596 


603 


516 


482 


4738 


369 


288 


336 


340 


361 


390 


395 


334 


298 


3111 


165 


152 


171 


156 


203 


206 


208 


182 


184 


1627 



534 



440 



507 



496 



564 



596 



603 



516 



482 



4738 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (2) 3 yrs. 

Sarah L. Warner 

Janet B. Hendl* 

Lynda Reid Warren 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

CONSTABLE 3 yrs. 

William E. Spence* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



326 


170 


231 


274 


293 


323 


317 


246 


293 


2473 


244 


167 


273 


235 


270 


312 


301 


240 


220 


2262 


212 


300 


264 


207 


258 


220 


279 


264 


180 


2184 


286 


243 


246 


276 


307 


337 


309 


282 


271 


2557 


1068 


880 


1014 


992 


1128 


1192 


1206 


1032 


964 


9476 


372 


316 


342 


376 


365 


416 


416 


348 


313 


3264 


162 


124 


165 


120 


199 


180 


187 


168 


169 


1474 



534 



440 



507 



496 



564 



596 



603 



516 



482 



4738 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) 3 yrs. 
Carl A. Olsson* 
Wendy C. Marcks 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD (2) 3 yrs. 

Ann H. McCarthy* 

Samuel J. Brink 

John F. McCarthy* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



340 


286 


324 


336 


358 


418 


388 


317 


291 


3058 


339 


248 


319 


291 


353 


353 


364 


292 


305 


2864 


389 


346 


371 


365 


417 


421 


454 


423 


368 


3554 


1068 


880 


1014 


992 


1128 


1192 


1206 


1032 


964 


9476 


287 


226 


307 


298 


289 


366 


346 


297 


231 


2647 


269 


207 


209 


200 


246 


224 


247 


206 


312 


2120 


226 


202 


222 


245 


302 


294 


288 


238 


149 


2166 


286 


245 


276 


249 


291 


308 


325 


291 


272 


2543 



1068 



880 



1014 



992 



1128 



1192 



1206 



1032 



964 



9476 



QUESTION 1 (Charter) 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



QUESTION 2 (Sewer) 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 



TOTAL 



298 


144 


298 


227* 


262 


322* 


335 


253 


269* 


2408' 


227 


294 


207 


265* 


299 


267 


265 


257 


211* 


2292' 


9 


2 


2 


6* 


3 


7* 


3 


6 


3* 


41' 



534 440 507 498* 564 596 603 516 483* 

•results of a recount held on April 26, 1989 for all pets, except Pet. 7 request by petition 



534 



440 



507 



496 



564 



596 



603 



516 



482 



4741' 



346 


229 


306 


271 


319 


363 


378 


312 


340 


2864 


175 


203 


187 


208 


233 


215 


217 


187 


131 


1756 


13 


8 


14 


17 


12 


18 


8 


17 


11 


118 



4738 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 24, 1989 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium, at 7:40 PM by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 528 voters present. 

The Moderator explained the town meeting rules and 
regulations. He also mentioned that this will probably be 
the last annual open town meeting. Pending the recount 
of the charter question which passed at the annual town 
election of April 4th, the Town voted to accept a charter 
and will have representative town meeting starting next 
year. The recount is scheduled for Wednesday April 26th. 

The Moderator announced that Thursday April 27th is 
Student Government Day at Chelmsford High School. The 
students who are participating in the event were present 
in the hall and they are as follows: 



Selectmen 

Jennifer Howard 
David Beaton 
David Rauktys 
Paul Ricciardi 

Planning Board 

Richard F. Burtt 
Edward Morris 
Judianne Rigazio 

Board of Assessors 

John Duggan 
Keith Cournoyer 
Jeffrey Dean 

Board of Health 

Teresa Chehna 
Brian Grzymski 
Manjula Sastry 

State Senator 
Brian Ritchie 

Library Trustee 

Jennifer Bush 
Patti Lee 

Treasurer 

and Tax Collector 

Jennifer Roche 

Town Clerk 

Karen Boss 

State Representative 

Bryan White 
Melissa Johnson 



Housing Authority 

Jamie Athanasoulas 
Lisa Provencher 



Town Accountant 

Matthew Cody 

Police Chief 

Gregg Silver 

Assistant Police Chief 
Jeff Hoyt 

Fire Chief 

Stacy Tyrrell 

Assistant Fire Chief 
Rob Gramer 

Supt. of Streets 
Mike Scollo 

Cemetery Supt. 

Deborah Coffey 

Building Inspector 

Steven Kelts 

Supt. of Schools 

John Edwards 

Ex. Sec, to Selectman 

Amy Hiltz 



Veteran's Agent 
Lauren Thomas 

Town Engineer 

Eric Pearson 

Sewer Commission 

Chris Backman 
Chris Davis 
Ben Winther 



Finance Committee 

Neil Costa 

Nicole Demoulpied 

Mike Flanagan 

School Committee 

Kim Marsella 
Stacey Kelley 
Kelsa Main 
Carolyn McCarthy 



The Moderator asked for a round of applause and 
thanked the students for their participation. 

Selectman Johnson moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Johnson 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked permission from the Town Meeting 
Body to allow Bernard Lynch, Thomas Carroll, and Wil- 
liam Mullen, to address the voters during the meeting. 
These people are Town Officials and Department Heads 
who are non-residents of the Town, who may be called upon 
to explain the articles. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Henrick J. Johnson, Jr. 
moved that the Town hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees. 

Selectman Johnson moved to nominate Norbert McHale 
to the Varney Playground Commission. Selectman Ready 
seconded. The Moderator asked if there were any other 
nominations, hearing none, he closed the nominations. He 
then asked for a voice vote, motion carried. This is one 
of the issues that could be decided by another article within 
the Town Meeting. When that time comes a decision will 
be made. 

The Moderator announced a Special Town Meeting has 
been scheduled for 8:00 PM. Selectman Johnson moved 
to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting, and it will reconvene 
immediately following the Special Meeting. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 8:00 PM. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

April 24, 1989 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at the 
McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium, at 8:00 PM by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 529 voters present. 

Selectman Johnson moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Johnson 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved the Town vote to transfer and appropriate (1) the 
sum of $400,000 from Surplus Revenue and (2) the sum 
of $100,000 from line item #146 Unemployment Benefits 
to Insurance (Life and Medical) Line Item #144. 

Bernard Lynch Executive Secretary to the Board of 
Selectmen explained the article. This article will transfer 
money from available funds to replenish the health insur- 
ance trust fund for the employees of the town. Due to 
changes in the law, the town is running a shortfall in the 
trust fund. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. Motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of $1581 from the Insurance Sinking Trust Fund to 
line item #19 Liability Insurance in order to reimburse the 
Town of Chelmsford's insurance carrier for payments made 
within the deductible provisions of said policy. 

Bernard Lynch explained that the insurance company 
paid the deductible for claims and now the Town must 
reimburse the insurance company. The Finance Commit- 
tee supported the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate (1) 
the sum of $17,768 from the unexpended proceeds of the 
amount authorized by Article 11 of the Special Town 
Meeting of May 9, 1988 and (2) the sum of $2,232 from 
the unexpended proceeds of the amount authorized by 
Article 13 of the 1986 Annual Town Meeting, for the follow- 
ing purpose: Police Department, Hot Top Existing Park- 
ing Lot and Driveways. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this would be the money 
left from capital improvement funds. If projects come in 
under bid, then the money can be transferred to another 
project by Town Meeting vote. The Police Department 
needed smoke detectors installed and the expense was less 
than anticipated, therefore the money left from this pro- 
ject if transferred will be used to apply to the bid of hot 
topping the areas mentioned at the Police Station which 
came in with a higher bid price than anticipated. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of $12,500 from Article 14 of the Special Town Meeting 
of September 25, 1986 to line item #77 Police Department 
Expenses (Emergency 911). 

The Finance committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of $209,968 from available funds (Chapter 90 Highway 
Funds Due from State) for the purpose of Chapter 90 
Highway construction. 



Bernard Lynch explained the article. A change in the 
law requires that Town now vote the actual monies needed 
for the Chapter 90 fund. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of $8,042 from line item #146 Unemployment Benefits 
to veterans Benefits Department Salaries line item #126. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this was the amount need- 
ed for sick leave by back for an employee who has retired. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
and Chairman of the Capital Planning Committee James 
Doukszewicz moved that the town vote to authorize the 
transfer of unexpended funds from Article 17 of the 1987 
Annual Town Meeting in the amount of $67,000.00 to an 
account to fund the following capital projects: 

1. Van for the Town Engineer Dept $15,000.00 

2. Masks for firefighters to conform 

with new regulations $12,000.00 

3. Water back-flow instatallation at 

three school buildings $40,000.00 

James Doukszewicz explained that this is money left over 
from other capital planning projects. The Engineer Depart- 
ment presently have a van which is unusable. Due to the 
different projects around the town a van is needed to get 
from site to site. The new masks for the firefighters are to 
conform with the new law concerning the health factor of 
smoke inhalation. The back-flow installation is to prevent 
the tap water not being used from flowing back into the 
town wells and system. This would prevent a health hazard, 
because bacteria and infection could get into the system. 
If voted tonight the bids could go out immediately and the 
projects could be started before the fiscal year ends. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion John Emerson moved that the Town vote to appropriate 
$39,000,000 as the local share of the cost for designing and 
constructing sewers, pump stations and force mains to com- 
plete the Town's Sewering Project to serve the Phase II and 
Phase III areas as defined in the Town's Facilities Plan for 
Wastewater Management, as amended, dated August 1986, 
and additional targeted "needs areas", including related 
legal, administrative and other pertinent expenses and the 
acquisition by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise of 
all necessary easements and rights in land; that to meet 
this appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $39,000,000 under G.L. 
c.44, s 8(15); that the Sewer Commission is authorized to 
contract for and expend any federal, state, or other aid 
available for the project; that betterments shall be assess- 
ed based on sewer construction in accordance with the 
applicable provisions of the General Laws; and that the 
Sewer Commission is authorized to take any other action 
necessary to carry out this project. 



10 



John Emerson explained that this is the funding needed 
to continue the present sewering project. It will show to 
the State the Town's obligation to go forward and finish 
the project. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen also recommended the ar- 
ticle. The motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of $800 from line item #146 Unemployment Benefits 
to Recreation Salaries line item #134, for the purpose of 
paying certain Recreation Commission salaries. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this money is to cover 
unforseen expenses that occurred last year at the Varney 
Playground area. There was an ongoing situation that re- 
quired additional personnel to patrol the area, and this 
is a reimbursement to that line item to cover that expense. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town, in certain parcels of land on Dover Street, shown 
as Lots 25 and 28 on Assessor's Map 45. 

Gary Bevis, a resident who abuts this property, explain- 
ed that he wants to purchase the land for his own use. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interest, if any held by the 
town, in a certain parcel of land on Mallory and Dover 
Streets, shown as Lot 30 on Assessor's Map 45. 

Thomas Bastien explained that because of a steep slope 
on his property, he wanted to purchase the land to improve 
his property. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town move to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interests if any held by the 
Town, in a certain parcel of land on Mallory and Dover 
Streets, shown as Lot 23 on Assessor's Map 45. 

Gary Bevis expressed his interest in purchasing this pro- 
perty, it abuts his property. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town in certain parcels of land on Eighth Avenue, shown 
as Lots 68 and 69 on Assessor's Map 67. 



Gary Bevis explained that he no longer owns the pro- 
perty that this land abuts, and wants to withdraw his inter- 
est in this lot or the one in Article 14. The Finance Com- 
mittee did not recommend the article. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 The Moderator explained that 
since Gary Bevis expressed in the previous article that he 
wished to withdraw his interest in this article, the Moderator 
accepted this as a formal withdrawal, and moved on to the 
next article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town in the following parcels of land located in the Crystal 
Lake Area of the town of Chelmsford, shown as the follow- 
ing lots: 

Map 62, Lot 14 containing approximately 6400 square feet 
Map 62, Lot 16 containing approximately 4020 square feet 

Sara Quinn who abuts this property mentioned, wanted 
the property in order to extend her present garden area. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate 
the sum of $3800 from line item #146 Unemployment 
Benefits to Selectmen Expenses line item 45 for the pur- 
pose of providing hepatitis B shots for firefighters, police 
officers and auxiliary police officers. 

Bernard Lynch explained that almost all the Town's 
Public safety officers received these shots last year. Once 
this money is transferred then those who needed the shots 
would get them. The total cost will be approximately 
$16,000.00 The Finance committee recommended the arti- 
cle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the town vote to transfer and appropriate 
from the Stabilization Fund the sum of $7500 to engage 
a private engineering firm to conduct a study relative to 
the depression of utility lines in Chelmsford Center. 

Selectman Ready explained that this would be a study 
for putting the utilities underground around the center of 
town. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
A number of residents spoke against the article. A discus- 
sion followed. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion defeated. There was a request for a hand count, the 
following tellers came forward: Margaret Johnson, Norman 
LeBrecque, Ruth Delaney, Cheryl Warshafsky, Gail Klem- 
mer, Jean Horgan, John Fudge, Jocelyn Anthony, Edward 
Marshall, and George Simonian. 

The Moderator attempted a show of hands before sending 
the tellers into the audience. He declared the motion 
defeated. 



11 



William Dalton wanted a point of information answered 
concerning article 1. The Moderator explained that before 
any information could be given the Town Meeting body 
would have to vote to reconsider article 1. William Dalton 
moved to reconsider article 1. He questioned where did the 
surplus revenue of $400,000 come from? The Finance Com- 
mittee explained that they were against the motion to 
reconsider the article that this money was free cash. Ber- 
nard Lynch explained that this was funds left over from 
fiscal year 1988. Money that the Town didn't expend 
through appropriations. Example, some expenses aren't 
what they were predicted to be, or additional receipts were 
received by the Town that weren't projected. The money 
is used for emergency purposes. Last year the money was 
used to fund the county retirement. A discussion follow- 
ed. William Dalton said if the money was spent tonight 
then there would be in fact no more free cash available 
to fund any additional requests. Bernard Lynch said that 
the Town would have to turn to other ways via overrides 
or raising and appropriating any additional monies need- 
ed for the 1989 fiscal expenditures. William Dalton wanted 
to table article 1 for a later date. The Moderator explain- 
ed that before that motion could be accepted the body 
would have to vote on whether or not to first consider the 
article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to reconsider article 1. Motion defeated. The chair 
was questioned on the voice vote. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands, he then asked the tellers to come forward 
and take a hand count. The result: Yes 171; No 233. The 
motion was defeated. 

The Moderator declared the Special Town Meeting ad- 
journed at 9:00 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



He then reconvened the Adjourned Annual Town 
Meeting at 9:01 PM. 



Selectman Johnson asked to officially withdraw article 
27. The Finance Committee recommended the article to 
be withdrawn. A discussion took place concerning the 
motion to withdraw. Joseph Paolilli wanted to have the ar- 
ticle heard as advertised. He moved to take the article out 
of order. The Moderator explained that there was a motion 
already before the Body to withdraw this article. The Board 
of Selectmen agreed to withdraw their motion to withdraw 
the article, therefore this would allow any discussion of the 
article to take place. Matthew Whiting spoke in favor of 
taking the article out of order. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to take the article out of order. 
This left the chair in doubt, he then asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 The Moderator read the article. 
The Finance Committee did not have any knowledge or 
opinion on the article. Selectman Johnson explained that 
especially since the Chief of Police was against this article 
the Board of Selectmen were all in favor of withdrawing 
the article. Selectman Johnson asked the Chief of Police 
Raymond McKeon to come forward and express his con- 
cerns. He said that the by-law was not his intent nor the 
Board of Selectmen's to hurt the sportsmen. The by-law 
does not differentiate between military weapons and hunt- 
ing weapons. Until better wording is presented he will be 
against any assault weapon by-law. Carleton McCauley 
spoke about his concerns of the rights of the citizens being 
taken away. Selectman Johnson moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands. It left 
the chair in doubt, he asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. He then asked for a voice vote on the 
main motion. Motion defeated, (see warrant for wording) 
Raymond Jones wanted to reconsider the article in order 
to be guaranteed no further attempts to change the vote. 
The Moderator explained that this procedure has changed. 
In the past if an article once voted was brought up again 
for reconsideration and the motion for reconsideration was 
defeated then the article couldn't be brought up again 
anytime during the night of the meeting. However, the by- 
law has changed and an article can be brought back for 
reconsideration at any time during the night it was voted. 
This avoids special interest groups leaving the meeting once 
their article has been passed. Raymond Jones withdrew his 
motion to reconsider the article. 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 24, 1989 

Selectman Johnson explained that due to the recount 
of the Charter being scheduled for Wednesday that a 
number of articles would be tabled pending the outcome 
of the recount. Articles 5, 7, 33, 35, 37 & 38. Articles 9 
& 29 were already passed in the Special so there would be 
no need to act on them. Article 27, the assault weapon by- 
law, is going to be withdrawn by the Board of Selectmen. 
Due to Federal and State legislation pending the Board felt 
that the article would be redundant. The Board did not 
feel comfortable with the article, nor did the Chief of 
Police. Selectman Johnson assured the Town Meeting body 
that this article would not be brought up for reconsidera- 
tion during this annual Town Meeting. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Elizabeth Delaney Chairman of 
the Personnel Board told the Body that the Board consists 
of two other members, Joan Gauther, Hal Matzkin and 
herself and that the Board makes the following recommen- 
dations. She proceeded to go through each of the twelve 
items appearing in the article and explained the purpose 
of the amendments. The Finance Committee supported the 
article in its entirety. Selectman Johnson moved to amend 
the article by deleting item 2 in its entirety. The Board felt 
that under the new charter this power of appointment will 
now be given to the Town Manager and not the Moderator 
as stated in the article. The Board feels that the Town 
Manager should have this power. Under Item 3 the Board 
wanted to delete this section also in its entirety. The Board 
was against implementing five weeks vacation. It would 
apply to a large number of employees and would cause 
budgetary constraints. It would be for the best interest of 
the entire town. The Finance committee does not support 



12 



the motion to amend. These employees effective would be 
within the management positions and there would be no 
cost factor involved. Elizabeth Delaney explained that there 
would be ten employees qualified for this fifth week as of 
July 1st. Presently there are an estimated ninety employees 
under the board's jurisdiction. 

Fifty- two full-time employees and nine regular part-time 
employees, and the rest are part-time hourly. Only twenty- 
four of these employees, which includes the ten employees 
eligible for the fifth week, are receiving four weeks vaca- 
tion after ten years of service. She listed yearly the future 
employees who would be eligible beginning in 1990 thru 
1997. It resulted in ten more employees. A salary survey 
done revealed that other towns offer this to their employees. 
Plus two unions within the town already have this benefit 
and the supervisors under the Personnel Board are super- 
vising these union employees. Elias Safdie supported the 
request for the fifth week. William Cady questioned if item 
5 the personal leave was a new section? It was explained 
that all full-time employees have had three days of per- 
sonal leave since 1978 — this amendment would apply to 
the regular part-time employees with twenty hours or more, 
which would be nine employees. More discussion took place 
concerning adding the additional members to the Board. 
Elizabeth Delaney explained that the Board wrote their 
article in December regardless of charter passing or not. 
The Board felt that their request was justified. There is 
a workload because of salary surveys and evaluations. The 
Board hopes to be able to add at least one member who 
is familiar in the area of compensation. Selectman Ready 
questioned again the appointment factor. He felt that the 
Selectmen should make the appointment because there will 
not be a Town Manager until some time in the fall. As far 
as the Personnel Board is concerned, it didn't matter who 
did the appointment or when it is done. The intention is 
to add two more members. Selectman Johnson said that 
the Board would withdraw the amendment due to the Per- 
sonnel Board's statement of willing to wait. The Moderator 
stated that if the Charter becomes effective on Wednesday 
then no appointment will be made until the Town Manager 
is appointed. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to withdraw. Motion carried. The Moderator then 
asked for a voice vote on the Selectmen's motion to delete 
the request of five weeks vacation. Motion defeated. Barry 
Bell questioned adding the Ass't Dog position. Bernard 
Lynch explained the money brought in from revenues will 
pay for the position. More discussion followed. A question 
was raised about the cost of living increase, number of steps 
in between the salary range and the total percentage given. 
There is a 3% cost of living increase recommended. There 
are eleven steps in the salary range with a 2 V6 % merit in- 
crease between each one, for a total of 5 V6 % • The Moder- 
ator asked for further discussion hearing none he asked for 
a voice vote on the article. Motion carried. Article reads 
as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Elizabeth Delaney 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 1989 as follows: 

1. Under Section 6 subtitled "Classification of Town 
Employees", amend Subsection (E)— "Wage and 
Salary Schedule" by deleting the existing schedule 
and substituting the following: 



E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1989— JUNE 30, 1990 

Grade Level Salary Range 

1 $ 8,312 - $10,349 
1A 13,501 - 16,809 
IB 15,260 - 18,999 
1C 17,022 - 21,192 
ID 20,543 - 25,576 

2 25,827 - 32,155 

3 34,632 - 43,116 

4 39,916 - 49,695 

5 45,201 - 56,275 



2. Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board" by 
deleting paragraphs 1 and 2 and substituting the 
following: 

"The plan shall be administered by a personnel 
board, consisting of five members, four of whom 
shall be known as public members and shall be ap- 
pointed by the Town Moderator for two years; two 
in odd number years and the other two in even 
number years. Each term shall expire at the end 
of the appropriate fiscal year. The Town Moderator 
shall fill the unexpired term of any public member 
who resigns his appointment. 

The fifth member, to be known as the personnel 
member, shall be elected by town employees who 
are subject to this by-law and whose name appears 
on the town payroll list for the Wednesday prior to 
the election or who otherwise is identified as an 
eligible voter. Each voter must be 18 years of age 
or over on the day of the election. The term of of- 
fice shall be for two years and shall expire on July 
1 of each odd numbered year. The election of the 
personnel member shall be secret and shall be 
supervised by a board of three Election officers ap- 
pointed by the Town Moderator. The election shall 
be held in June to be effective in July. Special elec- 
tions shall be held to fill the unexpired term of the 
personnel member who resigned before the term has 
expired. All elections shall be held between the 
hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on a weekday selected 
by the above mentioned board of three election of- 
ficers. Each permanent full-time employee or part- 
time regular employee with a work schedule over 
twenty (20) or more hours per week will be granted 
one vote. All other eligible voters will be granted 
V6 vote each." 

3. Under Section 14 subtitled "Vacation" by deleting 
Subsection (B) paragraph (IV) and adding the 
following: 

IV Employees who have been continuously 
employed for less than twenty years but more 
than ten years shall be granted four weeks vaca- 
tion with pay. 

V Employees who have been continuously 
employed for twenty years or more shall be 
granted five weeks vacation with pay. 



13 



4. Under Section 17 subtitled "Leaves of Absence" by 
deleting Subsections (A), (B), (C) and substituting 
the following: 

A. Without Pay: Leaves of absence may be granted 
by the appropriate Department Head but shall 
be without compensation. 

B. With Pay: A maximum of 10 days per year will 
be provided for persons called into temporary 
active duty of any unit of U.S. Reserves or the 
State National Guard. Employees will be paid 
the difference between their regular pay and the 
pay which they receive from the state or federal 
government. 

5. By adding a new section subtitled "Personal Leave" 
as follows: 

Section 18 Personal Leave 

A. All full-time employees are limited to three days 
leave with pay for personal reasons. 

B. Personal leave shall be granted to part-time 
regular employees with a work schedule over 
twenty (20) or more hours a week on a pro-rated 
basis. 

C. Personal reasons may include business, legal, 
religious or other matters not covered elsewhere 
by the leave provisions of these by-laws. Personal 
leave will be granted for the remedy of problems 
which cannot be conveniently resolved at times 
other than during the customary work day. Spe- 
cific personal reasons need not be given to super- 
visors but, except in cases of emergency when 
oral requests may be granted, requests for per- 
sonal leave should be given in writing to super- 
visors at least 48 hours prior to the time the leave 
is to begin. Unused personal days will be added 
to sick days for accrual purposes. 

6. Under Section 19 subtitled "Hours of Work" by 
deleting under Subsection (A) the following: 

V. Youth Center 37 V6 hours per week. 

7. Under Section 4 subtitled "Scope of Plan and 
Authority of the Personnel Board" by adding the 
following subsection D: 

D. The words "permanent full-time employee(s)" 

as appearing in these by-laws shall have the same 
meaning as "full-time employee(s)." 

8. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates of Wage and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting the 
following positions: 

Administrative and Clerical 

15. Human Resources Director 

Other Positions 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 
10. Clock Winder 



9. Under Section 24 Subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by renumbering the 
following positions: 

Administrative and Clerical 

15. Town Clerk 

16. Town Treasurer/Collector 

17. Assessor 

18. Assessor, Part-Time 

Other Positions 

6. Van Driver 

7. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

8. Animal Inspector 

9. Town Engineer 

10. Assistant Town Engineer 

11. Respite Care Program Director 

12. Home Delivered Meals Coordinator 

13. Superintendent of Buildings 

14. Senior Citizens Activities Coordinator 

15. Assistant Dog Officer 

10. Under Section 24 Subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by adding the 
following positions: 

Town Police Department 

5. Civilian Dispatcher 

Sewer Commission 

1. Sewer Superintendent 

2. Sewer Maintenance Mechanic 

11. Under Section 25 Subtitled "Compensation for 
Academic Achievement" by deleting the entire 
section. 

12. By renumbering the following Sections: 

18. Personal Leave 

19. Jury Duty 

20. Bereavement and Funeral Leave 

21. Hours of Work 

22. The Work Week 

23. Business Hours 

24. Amendment 

25. Repealer 

26. Job Titles and Standard Rates For Wages and 
Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
By-Law. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A Elizabeth Delaney Chairman of 
the Personnel explained that this is the Board's recommen- 
dation of grade levels for all positions that come under the 
Board's jurisdiction. She proceeded to go through each sec- 
tion and explained the amendments and added positions 
where necessary. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the arti- 
cle. Discussion took place concerning hourly rate of the 
Asst. Dog Officer and the hourly rate and responsibility 
of the Civilian Dispatcher. More discussion took place. Don- 
na Luedecke questioned the Ass't Dog Officer's hours and 
what qualifications were needed to be a Civilian Dispat- 
cher. Bernard Lynch explained that the Ass't Dog Officer 



14 



would rarely work more than fifteen hours a week. He is 
to work evenings and cover the weekends when the Dog 
Officer isn't available. Concerning the Civilian Dispatcher 
there is training available and the employees will be en- 
couraged to take advantage of this. A question was raised 
by Edward Nolet concerning the number of Deputy Chief 
positions available. Elizabeth Delaney explained that this 
is the grade level only of the position and doesn't reflect 
the actual number of people holding the position. Barry 
Balan moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote. Motion carried unanimously. The 
Article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Elizabeth Delaney 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law by further amending Section 26, "Job 
Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law", to conform to rates 
of pay negotiated by the Town with certain labor organiza- 
tions, pursuant to General Laws Chapter 150E, and to 
reflect current salaries and grade levels under the Person- 
nel By-Law as follows: 

7/88 - 7/89 7/89 - 7/90 

Current Proposed 

Level Level 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Executive Secretary 

2. Town Accountant 

3. Veterans' Agent 

4. Council of Aging Director 

5. Assistant to Assessors 

6. Assistant Town Clerk 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Clerk, Senior 

9. Clerk. Junior 

10. Clerk. Part-Time 

11. Town Counsel 

12. Board of Registrars, Three Members 

13. Assistant Town Accountant 

14. Admin. Assistant to the 
Executive Secretary 

15. Town Clerk 

16. Town Treasurer/Collector 

17. Assessor 

18. Assessor, Part-Time 

CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

3. Landscaper — Park 

4. Laborer— Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 

6. Skilled Forest Workman Conservation 

7. Equipment Operator 

8. Park Superintendent 

CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodial 

LIBRARY 

1. Library Director 

2. Library Department Head 

3. Library Specialist 

4. Library Assistant 

5. Library Clerk 

6. Maintenance Assistant 

7. Page 

8. Library Assistant Director 

9. Maintenance Specialist 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Truck Mechanic 
(Fire and Police) 

5. Auto Mechanic 
(Fire and Police) 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Trainee 

5. Civilian Dispatcher 



5 

3 

2 

2 

ID 

2 

2 

1C 

IB 

1A 

$500 P.A. 

$500 EA. 

2 

ID 
3 
3 
3 

1 



$1,250 P.A. 

1A 

1A 

#2, #3 

1A 

1C 

2 



5 

3 

2 

2 

ID 

2 

2 

1C 

IB 

1A 

$500 P.A. 

$500 EA. 

2 

ID 

3 

3 

3 

1 



$1,250 PA. 

1A 

1A 

#2,#S 

1A 

1C 

2 



4 


4 


ID 


2 


1C 


1C 


IB 


IB 


1A 


1A 


IB 


IB 


#2, #3 


#2, #3 


2 


3 


1C 


1C 


3 


3 


2 


2 


#2 


#2 


4 


4 


#2 


#2 


2 


2 


ID 


ID 


5 


5 


4 


4 


9 


3 


$359.50 PW. 


$359.50 P.W. 


1C 


1C 



1. 


Waterfront Director 


2. 


Swimming Instructor 


3. 


Lifeguard 


4. 


Program Supervisor 


5. 


Recreation Specialist 


6. 


Recreation Leader 


SEWER COMMISSION 


1. 


Sewer Superintendent 


2. 


Sewer Maintenance Mechanic 


OTHER POSITIONS 


1. 


Building Inspector 


2. 


Electric Inspector 


3. 


Local Inspector 


4. 


Gas Inspector 


5. 


Dog Officer 


6. 


Van Driver 


7. 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


8. 


Animal Inspector 


9. 


Town Engineer 


10. 


Assistant Town Engineer 


11. 


Respite Care Program Director 


12. 


Home Delivered Meals Coordinator 


13. 


Superintendent of Buildings 


14. 


Senior Citizens Activities Coord. 


15. 


Assistant Dog Officer 



1A 




1A 


1A 




1A 


1A 




1A 


IB 




IB 


1A 




1A 


1A 




1A 


3 




3 


2 




2 


3 




3 


2 




2 


2 




2 


#2 


$8,500 P.A. 


#2 $9,500 PA 


ID 




ID 


IB 




IB 


#2 


$2,000 P.A. 


#2 $2,000 PA 


#2 


$1,000 PA. 


#2 $1,000 P.A. 


3 




4 


2 




2 


ID 




ID 


1A 




1A 


ID 




ID 


IB 




IB 


IB 




IB 



FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 

#2 -Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

#S-$4.25/Hr. first year, $4.75/Hr. second year. $5.25/Hr. third year 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the 
sum of $22,500 to engage a private accounting firm to 
prepare and audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

James Doukszewicz explained that this is a yearly request 
that the Town must do in order to comply with state law. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $193 with which to meet bills of previous years. 

Selectman Johnson explained that this was a clothing 
bill submitted by the Police Department. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 James Harrington moved that the 
Town vote to accept provisions of Section 12 of Chapter 
188 of the Acts of 1985, the School Improvement Act in 
relation to the Equal Educational Opportunity Grant in 
the amount of Seventeen Thousand Nine Hundred Twen- 
ty Dollars ($17,920.00), for the Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School, conditioned upon the funding of said pro- 
grams by any source other than the Town of Chelmsford, 
and further conditioned upon, to the extent permitted by 
law, that said professional grant programs, and any monies 
paid to any employee of the Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School, shall not be used or considered a past practice for 
the purpose of collective bargaining and shall be nonrecur- 
ring lump sum payment not built into school employees 
salary schedules. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Dwight Hayward explained that this is a routine article. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 



15 



UNDER ARTICLE 7 Chairman of the School Commit- 
tee Barbara Ward moved to withdraw the article on the 
advice of Town Counsel. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. Motion 
carried, unanimously, (see warrant for wording) 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
the Stabilization Fund the sum of $60,000 for the purpose 
of purchasing Four (4) Police Cruisers for the Police Depart- 
ment and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale Four 
(4) obsolete vehicles: and moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Chairman of the Capital Planning 
Committee James Doukszewicz, moved to dismiss this ar- 
ticle. The Finance recommended dismissal of the article. 
This article was already passed in the special town meeting 
under article 7. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Chairman of the Capital Plan- 
ning Committee James Doukszewicz, explained the arti- 
cle. The Capital Planning process began from October 1988 
through January 31, 1989. The items shown are the recom- 
mended list Jrom the review process. He proceeded to read 
each line item and explained the request. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. A discussion fol- 
lowed. Mike McTeague, Edward Fultz, Matthew Whiting, 
asked questions about the different items. A lengthy discus- 
sion took place about item 21, numerous questions were 
asked. Thomas Carroll of the School Department explained 
the request. More discussion took place. Matthew Whiting 
moved to amend the article by deleting line item 21 from 
article. The Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men were against the motion to amend. Discussion took 
place. Selectman Johnson moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion carried unanimously. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to delete item 21, motion 
defeated. A question was raised on item 9 by William 
White. Would the police department be receiving semi 
automatic weapons? Bernard Lynch said the the whole 
department would be supplied semi automatic weapons. 
William White wanted to know if the citizens will be able 
to purchase the old hand guns. James Doukszewicz ex- 
plained that the dollar amount shown included the trade- 
in value of the old guns. After more discussion Scott 
McCaig moved the question to stop debate. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the article, motion carried, unanimously. The article 
reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Capital Planning Committee James 
Doukszewicz, and Selectman Henrick Johnson moved that 
the Town vote to borrow the sum of $1,546,823. for the 
following capital projects: 

SEWER COMMISSION 

1. Truck for foreman $14,000.00 



2. Completion of 

draining facilities plan $237,123.00 

3. Funds for alleviation of 

drainage problems $30,000.00 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

4. Data processing equipment $14,000.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

5. Two 1,4 -ton pick-up trucks $28,000.00 

6. Road resurfacing $400,000.00 

7. Sand screening plant $40,000.00 

8. One cab and frame truck 

with sander $48,000.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

9. Replace handguns $14,000.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

10. New pumping engine $195,000.00 

11. Improvements to station 03 building . $10,000.00 

LIBRARY 

12. Exterior siding & insulation work 
for Carriage House, Children's House 

and Adams Library? $40,000.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

13. Chairlift for Old Town Hall 

& installation $20,000.00 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

14. Rte. 129 traffic study $50,000.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

15. Gas burners at Byam School 

replaced $31,000.00 

16. Septic system & treatment plant 

at High School $10,000.00 

17. South Row Roof work $225,000.00 

18. McCarthy Roofs recoated $10,200.00 

19. New generator for 

McCarthy School $25,500.00 

20. Restroom conversion work 

for handicap access $75,000.00 

21. 15 word processors for Grade 06 
at McCarthy plus modems, 

wiring and installation $30,000.00 

TOTAL $1,546,823.00 

Michael McTeague moved to ajourn the meeting until 
Monday evening May 1, 1989 at 7:30 PM, the McCarthy 
Middle School Gymnasium. A point of order was raised 
by Gregg Jones about the assault weapon by-law. Could this 
article be brought up again this year once this meeting ad- 
journs? The Moderator explained that the article could not 
be brought back at anytime during this annual meeting. 
An article would have to be submitted for another Annual 
or Special Town Meeting. It could not be brought up again 
on Monday May 1st. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to adjourn, motion carried, unanimously. 
The Meeting adjourned at 11:00 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



16 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 1, 1989 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium, at 7:40 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 558 voters present. 

The Moderator explained the town meeting rules and 
regulations. He also pointed out the fire exits within the 
gymnasium. 

Selectman Henrick Johnson moved to ask permission 
from the Town Meeting Body to allow Bernard Lynch, 
Thomas Carroll, and William Mullen, to address the voters 
during the meeting. These people are Town Officials and 
Department Heads who are non-residents of the Town, who 
may be called upon to explain the articles. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

Selectman Johnson moved to take article 5 off the table. 
Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman Johnson moved 
to dismiss this article. With the ratification of vote of the 
Charter last Wednesday this article now comes under the 
jurisdiction of the new charter and it is not necessary for 
the body to act on it. The Finance Committee recommend- 
ed the motion to withdraw. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Henrick Johnson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire in fee simple by purchase, eminent domain 
or otherwise, a certain parcel of property situated at Hunt 
and Littleton Roads, more particularly described on a Plan 
entitled "Plan of land, Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
prepared by Howe Survey, Associates, March 16, 1989" 
and on file with the Town Engineer, for highway purposes 
and I move that the town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1500 to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land and for pay- 
ing any damage which may be awarded as the result of any 
such taking. 

Selectman Johnson explained that this is property needed 
to correct one of the most dangerous intersections in Town. 
The fee is not a large one. The Finance committee recom- 
mended the article. Norman LeBrecque questioned if the 
taking was a friendly one. James Harrington explained that 
the money amount shown is the exact appraisal value of 
the land. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, to lease for a ten year term, a certain parcel 
of land shown as Lot 51 on Assessors Map 46 with provi- 
sions for removing sand from the property for municipal 
purposes: and to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000 
for the first year of said lease. 

Bernard Lynch explained that presently the Town is pay- 
ing $8.00 per yard for sand. The land in this article is six 



acres and contains an estimate of 90,000 yards of sand. 
The cost per yard would be $2.00 per yard. Even after pay- 
ing the ten year lease the savings would be $300,000. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article, but remind- 
ed the body that the Town will be paying $20,000 per year 
for ten years. A discussion took place. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson 
Jr. moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Clause 41C and Clause 17D of Chapter 59, Section 5 of the 
General Laws of Massachusetts which permit limited pro- 
perty tax exemptions for qualifying low income residents. 

John Shepardson who submitted the article explained 
that it would be a benefit for the many elderly taxpayers 
who are on a fixed income. The Finance Committee did 
not support the article because it will mean less revenue 
for the town. The Board of Selectmen recommended it. 
Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz explained tht the 
money for the abatements comes from the abatement 
reserve funds, not from the actual tax money. Assessor 
Diane Philips explained that this would also include any 
widow regardless of age. She gave an estimate of the 
number of abatements and the dollar amount involved. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 



UNDER ARTICLE 14 The Moderator explained that 
he would go through and read each department's total 
budget figure and ask if there was any need for discussion. 
He began with the Accounting Department and went as 
far as Cable TV Commission. A question was asked con- 
cerning this budget. Jacob Sartz explained that the money 
is used for the local cable channel 43 to do live broadcasts 
such as town meetings, Selectmen and School Committee 
Meetings. The Moderator read from Conservation Commis- 
sion to the Insurance (Liability) budget. Richard Codling 
wanted to know exactly what type of insurance this per- 
tained to. Bernard Lynch explained that this included a 
number of different types of insurance policies. It includ- 
ed the General liability of the Town. Motor vehicle insur- 
ance, equipment liability. Police special liability, workman's 
compensation. The Moderator read the Law Department 
budget. William Dalton raised a question about line item 
24. He wanted to know what was special counsel? Bernard 
Lynch explained that this was the expense of special counsel 
used for labor negotiations. A discussion took place. The 
Moderator read from Medical Bills Retired Police & Fire 
through Public Buildings. Norman LeBrecque asked why 
the salary account was reduced. Bernard Lynch explained 
that the custodian staff was being reduced by a half of per- 
son. The Moderator read from the Registrars Department 
to the Dog Officer Budget. Richard Tevlin questioned the 
care of live animals having a zero figure. Bernard Lynch 
said that the Selectment wanted to amend the figure. The 
Moderator read the motion. Selectman Henrick Johnson 
moved to increase line item 56 under the Dog Officer 
Budget by $1800 for a total hearing budget of $36,886. The 
Moderator asked for any discussion, hearing none he ask- 
ed for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. He proceeded to read from Emergency 
Management Agency to the Fire Department where a 
discussion took place. William Dalton wanted to know why 
the salaries line item increased. Bernard Lynch explained 



17 



that this was the cost of living increase and projected merit 
increases for the employees under the personnel board, and 
the clerical union, plus the additional deputy chief. 
William Dalton questioned why the deputy chief was add- 
ed and not four lieutenants and six firefighters. Bernard 
Lynch said that the decision was made by the Fire Chief. 
The study did recommend the additional changing staff, 
however it said due to the problem of the minimum man- 
ning clause this would defeat the purpose of adding the 
additional men. More discussion took place concerning the 
salaries. William Dalton stated that the men only make 
$10.52 an hour. The Moderator read the Hydrant Service 
and Selectman Dennis Ready made a statement thanking 
the Water Department for their cooperation in maintain- 
ing the hydrants and reducing this to a zero budget. Under 
Inspect/ Pest Control a discussion took place. James Sousa 
questioned why there is such a difference from what has 
been expended from previous years to what is being re- 
quested for this year's budget. He used line item 67 and 
also line items 2, 24, 41, 56, as an example. Bernard Lynch 
explained that these budget figures reflect transfers which 
are made for unforseen circumstances that happen through 
the year. Richard Day explained the insect pest control is 
done only at certain time of the year. And the higher figure 
is what the state expected the town to spend on control. 
Due to budget constraints the decision was made to ask 
for only what would really be needed for the time being. 
The Moderator proceeded to read from the Inspection 
Department to the Highway Department, where Norman 
LeBrecque questioned line item 68 under the Inspection 
Department. Bernard Lynch explained that this included 
a one time sick by-back figure for an employee. Under the 
Highway Department Selectman Henrick Johnson moved 
to increase line item 85 Salary to read $614,914 and decrease 
line item 86 expenses to read $436,440 for a total Highway 
Department of $1,321,354. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the motion to amend. Norman LeBrecque ques- 
tioned why if there is an increase in the figure that the 
figure is still lower than the amount requested. There is 
definitely a need for work to be done on the streets and 
other areas in town. Why does it seem like the work force 
is being reduced. This department is always being cut back. 
Bernard Lynch explained the difference in the figures. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator read from 
Street Lighting through Sewer Department. A question was 
asked why the salary line item was increased? John Emer- 
son explained that this figure reflected the salary of the 
two new employees, the Superintendent and the 



Maintenance Mechanic. Under the Waste Collection a 
discussion took place. Voters voiced their concerns about 
the rising cost. It was mentioned that the unfairness of 
other budgets being cut back while this one is increasing 
without any control above the 2V6% increase allowed. 
Under the School Department budget Chairman of the 
School Committee Barbara Ward moved to amend the bot- 
tom line to be increased by $10,000. This is the appropria- 
tion from Public Law 874 in the amount of $10,000 for a 
net School Department of $21,131,513. The School Com- 
mittee just received this figure. The amount will be reim- 
bursed by the Federal Government, but it must show in 
the budget before any reimbursement will be made. 
Basically it will be a washout. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the motion to increase. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to increase, motion carried, 
unanimously. Under the Council on Aging Henrick Johnson 
moved to reduce line item 114 to read $98,030 for a total 
budget figure of $121,780. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the motion. Motion carried, unanimously, by voice 
vote. The Moderator read from Cultural Council through 
the Recreation Department. A question was asked concer- 
ning the salary increase. Bernard Lynch explained that this 
reflects the cost of covering the additional fields and Varney 
Playground. The Moderator read from Varney Playground 
through the Debt and Interest Budget. Dwight Hayward 
moved to reduce line 147 interest payment by the amount 
of available overlay surplus reserve of $81,618, for a total 
budget figure of $2,004,182. Dwight Haywood explained 
that this is money that has become available and accor- 
ding to state law must be used to reduce a budget. The 
Finance Committee selected this budget as the one where 
the money will be used. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion, motion carried. The Moderator ask- 
ed that the Town Meeting Body vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $42,660,214 plus the transfer from 
PL874 of $10,000, and the transfer from the overlay surplus 
reserve account of $81,618 for the total operating budget 
figure of $42,751,832. A discussion took place concerning 
the funding of the School Department and Fire Depart- 
ment contracts. Dwight Haywood explained that there 
would be a number of options available. Either a user's fee 
could be used for the trash pick up. An override is another 
option. As July 1st free cash will be available as well as other 
departmental receipts such as collection of back real-estate 
taxes. The Moderator asked for further discussion, hear- 
ing none he asked for a voice vote on the total operating 
figure of $42,751,832. Motion carried unanimously. The 
article reads as follows: 



FY88 
Expended 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 5% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



FY89 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
Reserve Fund 

Transfers) 



FY90 
Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

1. Salary $ 105,621 

2. Expense 9,519 

3. Outlay 0_ 

Total Accounting Department $ 115,140 



112,430 

3,000 

1 



115,431 



118,321 

3,000 

1 



121,322 



18 





FY89 






Appropriated 


FY90 




(Includes 


Finance 




Special Town 


Committee 




Meetings and 


Recommendation 


FY88 


Reserve Fund 


(For Balanced 


tpended 


Transfers) 


Budget) 


141,512 


$ 160,861 


$ 158,718 


58,830 


56,970 


56,555 


1,100 


800 


500 








1 


1,665 


6,610 


5,000 


2,100 


33,000 


33,000 



ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT 

4. Salary ! 

5. Expense 

6. Outlay 

7. Out-of-State 

8. Legal Services 

9. Revaluation Update 

Total Assessors Department $ 205,207 $ 258,241 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

10. Expense $ 7,137 $ 26,317 

1988 Annual Receipts: $7,395 
CABLE TV COMMISSION 

11. Expense $ 3,500 $ 3,650 

1988 Annual Receipts: $3,673 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

12. Salary $ 4,381 $ 6,398 

13. Expense 2,859 7,615 

Total Conservation Commission $ 7,240 $ 14,013 

1988 Annual Receipts: $1,474 

CONSTABLE 

14. Salary $ 361 $ 500 

DATA PROCESSING 

15. Expense $ 9,435 $ 18,670 

ELECTIONS 

16. Wages & Expenses $ 18,699 $ 30,569 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

17. Expense $ 2,551 $ 3,150 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

18. Expense $ 332 $ 1,560 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

19. Expense $ 1,220 $ 1,500 

INSURANCE (LIABILITY) 

20. Expense $ 673,258 $ 662,009 

LAW 

21. Salary % 500 $ 500 

22. Expense 741 750 

23. Legal Services 48,848 55,000 

24. Special Counsel 39,840 15,000 

Total Law Department $ 89,929 $ 71,250 

MEDICAL BILLS RETIRED POLICE & FIRE 

25. Expense $ 4,329 $ 2,500 



253,774 



6,449 



4,000 



$ 6,815 

4,150 



10,965 



% 


500 


% 


15,670 


% 


27,585 


$ 


3,150 


$ 


1,712 


$ 


1,575 


$ 


718,800 


% 


500 

750 

58,750 

15,000 


% 


75,000 


% 


2,500 



19 



FY89 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
FY88 Reserve Fund 

Expended Transfers) 

MOBILE HOME RENT CONTROL BOARD 

26. Expense $ 1,372 $ 1 

MODERATOR 

27. Salary $ 300 $ 300 

28. Expense 75 75_ 

Total Moderator $ 375 $ 375 

NMAC 

29. Expense $ 9,000 $ 9,068 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

30. Expense $ 579 $ 800 

PLANNING BOARD 

31. Salary $ 18,421 $ 20,113 

32. Expense 3,498 4,326 

33. Outlay 1_ 

Total Planning Board $ 21,919 $ 24,440 

1988 Annual Receipts: $9,250 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

34. Salary $ 61,921 $ 80,401 

35. Expense 60,459 66,850 

36. Outlay 2,917 4,000 

Total Public Buildings $ 125,297 $ 151,251 

1988 Annual Receipts: $35,160 

REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

37. Salary $ 24,418 $ 26,257 

38. Expense 9,888 10,320 

39. Outlay (Net of $3,400 Grant) 1_ 

Total Registrars Department $ 34,306 $ 36,578 

SELECTMEN DEPARTMENT 

40. Salary $ 95,607 $ 108,489 

41. Expense 33,145 22,200 

42. Outlay 1 

43. Out of State 580 1,500 

Total Selectmen Department $ 129,332 $ 132,190 

1988 Annual Receipts: $108,088 

TOWN CLERK 

44. Salary $ 108,609 $ 109,507 

45. Expense 5,767 6,700 

46. Out of State 153 801 

47. Outlay 400 1_ 

Total Town Clerk Department $ 114,929 $ 117,009 

1988 Annual Receipts: $26,994 

TOWN CLOCK 

48. Expense $ 600 $ 1 



FY90 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 



300 

75 



$ 


375 


$ 


9,068 


$ 


1,200 


$ 


20,459 

4,502 

1 



24,962 



73,811 
60,174 
3,500 



137,485 



27,677 

11,925 

1 



39,603 



115,878 

21,800 



1,500 



139,178 



115,263 

6,650 

800 

1 



122,714 



20 



FY89 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
FY88 Reserve Fund 

Expended Transfers) 

TOWN & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS 

49. Expense $ 5,200 $ 6,500 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

50. Salary $ 167,121 $ 179,021 

51. Expense 41,200 34,624 

52. Outlay 460 5,780 

Total Treasurer/Collector $ 208,781 $ 219,425 

1988 Annual Receipts: $543,884 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 13.5% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



FY90 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 



6,500 



180,997 

37,975 

1 



218,973 



DOG OFFICER 

53. Salary $ 26,671 $ 22,025 

54. Expense 3,224 8,000 

55. Pound Rental 1,000 1 

56. Care of Live Animals 1,786 1,800 

Total Dog Officer Department $ 32,681 $ 31,826 

1988 Annual Receipts: $27,057 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 

57. Expense $ 1,348 $ 2,190 

58. Outlay 1,020 1,101 

Total Emergency Management Agency $ 2,368 $ 3,291 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

59. Salary $ 2,403,274 $ 2,459,282 

60. Expense 129,251 157,010 

61. Out of State 1,000 

62. Outlay 13,360 18,485 

Total Fire Department $ 2,545,885 $ 2,635,777 

Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 30,000 

Net Cost to Fire Department $ 2,515,885 $ 2,635,777 

1988 Annual Receipts: $4,052 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

63. Center $ 54,700 % 

64. North 19,300 

65. East 7,000 0_ 

Total Hydrant Service $ 81,000 $ 

INSECT/PEST CONTROL 

66. Salary $ 1,250 $ 1,250 

67. Expense 10,680 5,800 

Total Insect/Pest Control $ 11,930 % 7,050 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

68. Salary $ 169,359 $ 179,126 

69. Expense 15,025 17,251 

70. Out-of-State 384 500 

71. Outlay 1 

Total Inspection Department $ 184,768 $ 196,878 

1988 Annual Receipts: $313,572 



28,586 

6,500 



1,800 



36,886 



1,758 
1,105 



2,863 



2,526,290 

175,460 

1,500 

16,910 



2,720,160 




2,720,160 



1,250 
5,800 



7,050 



194,544 

16,905 

500 

1 



211,950 



21 



FY89 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
FY88 Reserve Fund 

Expended Transfers) 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

72. Salary $ 2,232,928 $ 2,377,449 

73. Expense 269,239 212,309 

74. Out-of-State 1,350 1,500 

75. Outlay 25,809 1 

76. Expense— Auxiliary 3,070 2,631 

77. Outlay— Auxiliary 100 

78. Police Mutual Aid 2,000 1_ 

Total Police Department $ 2,534,396 $ 2,593,991 

Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 30,000 

Net Cost to Police Department $ 2,504,396 $ 2,593,991 

1988 Annual Receipts: $289,397 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

79. Salary $ 2,100 $ 2,100 

80. Expense 112 300_ 

Total Sealer of Weights & Measures $ 2,212 $ 2,400 

1988 Annual Receipts: $1,380 

TRAFFIC & SAFETY COMMITTEE 

81. Expense $ 21,594 $ 49,300 

TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 

82. Salary $ 1,000 $ 1,000 

83. Expense 13,874 13,875 

84. Outlay 1_ 

Total Tree Warden Department $ 14,874 $ 14,876 

HIGHWAYS; 3.696 OF TOTAL BUDGET 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

85. Salary $ 665,497 $ 659,945 

86. Expense 464,994 458,593 

87. Snow & Ice 484,825 270,000 

Total Highway Department % 1,615,316 $ 1,388,538 

Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 7,200 

Net Cost Highway Department $ 1,615,316 $ 1,381,338 

STREET LIGHTING 

88. Expense $ 132,399 $ 140,000 

TOWN ENGINEER 

89. Salary $ 77,765 $ 84,492 

90. Expense 9,374 10,885 

91. Out-of-State 1 

92. Outlay 531 1,000 

Total Town Engineer $ 87,670 $ 96,378 

1988 Annual Receipts: $2,649 



FY90 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 

$ 2,499,792 

234,400 

1,500 

5,300 

3,000 

500 





2,744,492 




$ 2,744,492 



2,100 
300 



2,400 



32,500 



1,000 
12,875 

1 



13,876 



614,914 
436,440 
270,000 



1,321,354 




$ 1,321,354 



140,000 



86,664 

13,750 

1 

1 



100,416 



22 





FY89 






Appropriated 


FY90 




(Includes 


Finance 




Special Town 


Committee 




Meetings and 


Recommendation 


FY88 


Reserve Fund 


(For Balanced 


Expended 


Transfers) 


Budget) 



HEALTH & SANITATION: 4.6% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

93. Salary $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 

94. Expense 200 400 400 

Total Animal Inspector $ 1,200 $ 1,400 $ 1,400 

LOWELL MENTAL HEALTH 

95. Expense $ 8,695 $ 12,000 $ 9,000 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

96. Salary $ 116,177 $ 123,256 $ 131,413 

97. Expense 28,419 32,225 33,850 

98. Out-of-State 1 1 

99. Outlay 1 1 

100. Mosquito Control 2,528 10,000 10,000 

Total Health Department $ 147,124 $ 165,483 $ 175,265 

1988 Annual Receipts: $44,584 

SEWER COMMISSION 

101. Salary $ 36,414 $ 91,999 $ 124,866 

102. Expense 19,240 45,000 85,500 

103. Out-of-State 2,167 5,000 5,000 

104. Outlay 1 1 

105. Professional Fees 54,992 65,000 65,000 

Total Sewer Commission $ 112,813 $ 207,000 $ 280,367 

WASTE COLLECTION 

106. Expense $ 1,182,333 $ 1,182,334 $ 1,500,000 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 49.5% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

107. Salary $ 15,394,906 $ 16,070,546 $ 

108. Expense 4,272,925 4,707,016 

Total School Department $ 19,667,831 $ 20,777,562 $ 21,131,513 

NASHOBA: 1.5% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

109. Total Town Assessment $ 637,520 $ 677,490 $ 630,776 

COMMUNITY SERVICE: 2.7% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

110. Salary $ 138,574 $ 155,564 $ 137,947 

111. Expense 26,424 28,702 30,930 

112. Out-of-State 500 1 500 

113. Outlay 3,094 2,800 3,600 

Total Cemetery Department $ 168,592 $ 187,067 $ 172,977 

1988 Annual Receipts: $21,045 



23 



FY89 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
FY88 Reserve Fund 

Expended Transfers) 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

114. Salary $ 83,782 $ 89,331 

115. Expense 24,463 15,160 

Total Council on Aging $ 108,245 $ 104,491 

1988 Annual Receipts: $25,241 

CULTURAL COUNCIL 

116. Expense $ 95 $ 100 

ELDER SERVICES OF MERRIMACK VALLEY 

117. Expense % 1,800 $ 1,800 

COMMISSION ON HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

118. Expense $ 94 $ 1,900 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

119. Salary $ 443,667 $ 486,176 

120. Expense 79,137 89,220 

121. Out-of-State 550 

122. Outlay 1 

123. Books & Periodicals 112,512 120,750 

Total Library Department $ 635,316 $ 696,647 

1988 Annual Receipts: $16,830 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

124. Salary $ 51,087 $ 58,237 

125. Expense 4,425 4,470 

126. Outlay 100 1 

127. Cash & Material Grant 54,266 55,120 

Total Veterans Benefits Department $ 109,878 $ 117,828 

Grant Reimbursement @75% 

PARKS & RECREATION: .3% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

128. Expense $ $ 700 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

129. Salary $ 35,193 $ 41,902 

130. Expense 4,786 6,700 

131. Outlay 1_ 

Total Park Department $ 39,979 $ 48,603 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

132. Salary $ 41,360 $ 44,843 

133. Expense 23,593 16,833 

134. Outlay 1_ 

Total Recreation Department $ 64,953 $ 61,677 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

135. Salary $ 3,979 $ 3,308 

136. Expense 1,273 2,099 

137. Outlay 3,300 

Total Varney Playground $ 5,252 $ 8,707 



FY90 
Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 

$ 104,915 

23,750 



128,665 



150 



1,800 



300 



529,554 

86,157 

500 

1 

129,200 



745,412 



55,855 

4,605 

1 

55,120 



115,581 



42,916 

6,700 

1 



49,617 



53,500 

24,742 

1 



78,243 



24 



PUBLIC CELEBRATION: FY88 

.0% OF TOTAL BUDGET Expended 

HOLIDAY DECORATING COMMITTEE 

138. Expense $ 750 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

139. Expense $ 1,000 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

140. Expense $ 2,213 

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: 8.1% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

COUNTY RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT 

141. Expense $ 1,182,316 

INSURANCE (LIFE & MEDICAL) 

142. Expense $ 500,055 

MEDICARE TAX (FICA) 

143. Expense $ 22,630 

UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (STATE) 

144. Expense $ 10,764 

VETERANS PENSION CLAIMS 

145. Expense $ 6,068 

DEBT SERVICE: 6.8% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

DEBT & INTEREST 

PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS: 

Westland and Harrington Schools ... $ 70,000 

Byam School 100,000 

School Bldg. Capital Improv #6 540,150 

Sewer Plans & Design 252,000 

Capital Improv. Art. 13-1986 

Capital Improv. Art. 17-1987 

Sewer Construction Phase 1*** 

Conservation Land Purchase 

146. Total Principal Payments $ 962,150 

INTEREST PAYMENTS: 

Anticipation and other temporary 

loans $ 337,116 

Bond Anticipation Notes*** 

Westland and Harrington Schools . . . 3,010 

Byam Elem. School 15,000 

School Bldg. Capital Improv. 24,307 

Sewer Plans & Design 32,446 

Capital Improv. Art. 13-1986 57,375 

Capital Improv. Art. 17-1987 

Capital Improv. Art. 13-1988 

Senior Citizen Ctr.*** 

Sewer Construction Phase 1*** 

Conservation Land Purchase 

147. Total Principal Payments $ 469,254 

***Exempt Principal and Interest $2,789,945 

Minus Transfer from Overlay Surplus Fund 
Net Total 

Total Operating Budget $ 35,046,203 





FY89 








Appropriated 




FY90 




(Includes 




Finance 




Special Town 




Committee 




Meetings and 


Recommendation 




Reserve Fund 




(For Balanced 




Transfers) 




Budget) 


$ 


750 


$ 


250 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,500 



$ 1,288,092 

$ 1,300,656 

$ 32,500 

$ 200,000 

$ 6,630 




100,000 


250,000 
575,000 


500,000 
175,000 



$ 1,454,049 

$ 1,886,148 

$ 40,000 

$ 75,000 

$ 6,895 




100,000 


250,000 
575,000 
500,000 
1,300,000 
175,000 



$ 1,600,000 



230,000 

550,000 



9,000 



21,340 

100,375 

58,190 





342,000 

58,480 



$ 2,900,000 



230,000 

575,000 



3,000 



10,340 

71,625 

105,500 

119,810 

69,545 

854,400 

46,580 



$ 1,369,385 



$ 2,085,800 

81,618 
2,004,182 



$ 39,113,405 



$ 42,751,832 



25 






UNDER ARTICLE 15 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee Dwight Hayward, moved that the town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $200,000 to be used as a 
Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Dwight Hayward explained that this is the money set 
aside for the Finance Committee to have when departments 
have emergency requests through the year. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Treasurer James Doukszewicz, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
to enter into compensating balance agreements, during 
Fiscal Year 1990, as permitted by General Laws Chapter 
41, Section 53F. 

James Doukszewicz explained that this allows the town 
to invest monies with banks and in return the banks will 
provide the payroll service and data processing service at 
no charge to the town. It saves the town an estimated 
$8,000 a year. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Treasurer James Doukszewicz, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the Financial year beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17 and 17(a). 

James Doukszewicz explained this is a yearly item that 
gives the Treasurer permission to borrow until the revenue 
comes in from the tax bills. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Chairman of the Cemetery Com- 
mission, Charlotte DeWolf moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the sum of $15,000 from the sale of graves and lots 
to the Improvement and Development Fund of the 
Cemetery Department. 

Cemetery Superintendent Frank Peterson explained the 
article. The Finance committee recommmended the arti- 
cle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Chairman of the Planning Board 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zon- 
ing By-law by deleting the present zoning map and substi- 
tuting the redrafted map proposed by the Planning Board, 
as filed with the Town Clerk, and displayed at the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Ann McCarthy read the Planning Board's 
recommendation : 

At the Planning Board meeting of February 8, 1989 the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (6-0) of the proposal 
to amend the zoning by-laws and zoning map from (P) 
Public to Roadside (CB). 



Ann McCarthy explained that this land was the Landry 
Gas Station on Route 27 Acton Road. It should not have 
been zoned public land. A mistake was made on the map 
and it should have always been zoned CB roadside com- 
mercial. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. The Board of Selectmen support the article. A % 's vote 
is required. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 John McCarthy moved that the 
Town vote to accept the provisions of paragraph 13 of 
General Law Chapter 41 Section 81U, authorizing the Plan- 
ning Board, with Selectmen approval, to use subdivision 
construction bond or deposit proceeds without appropria- 
tion, if the total amount of such proceeds do not exceed 
$100,00.00. 



Ann McCarthy 
recommendation : 



read the Planning Board's 



At the Planning Board meeting if April 12, 1989 the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (6-0) to recommend 
Article 20 of the Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 

Ann McCarthy explained that this would allow the 
Board to use bond money from the subdivisions control 
law for appropriations rather than having to float a bond 
then come back to Town Meeting for appropriations. Town 
Counsel James Harrington verified this information. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Mod- 
erator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 The Moderator asked permission 
from the Town Body to waive the requirement of him not 
to read the entire article. Motion carried. Bernard Lynch 
explained that this article updates the proceeds currently 
listed in the present by-law as recommended by the Town 
Engineer. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Board of Selectman Henrick Johnson 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Law, 
Article V Streets and Sidewalks, as follows: 

1. Under Section 2, Plans, Surveys, Measurements and 
Control by deleting Section 2.1 in its entirety and 
substituting in its place the following: 

2.1 Unless specifically waived by the Highway 
Superintendent, all applications for a permit 
under this By-Law shall be accompanied with 
the following: 

2. Under Section 8, subtitled Construction Standards, 
by deleting Subsection 8.12 Grading, Rolling and 
Finishing in its entirety and substituting the following: 

8.12 Grading, Rolling and Finishing 

8.12.1 The word "approved" as appearing in Section 
8 shall mean conforming to Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works Specifications, 
as amended. 



26 



8.12.2 The trench in the street must be filled and 
temporarily resurfaced on the same day it is 
opened unless otherwise directed by the 
Highway Superintendent or his designee. The 
trench shall be backfilled with approved ex- 
cavated materials to within nineteen and one- 
half (19 V6 ) inches of the top. Eighteen (18) in- 
ches shall consist of approved gravel (State 
DPW Spec. Ml. 03.0 type b) and the remain- 
ing one and one-half (1V&) inches shall con- 
sist of temporary bituminous surface. Road 
surface shall be pre-cut to avoid damaging 
surfaces surrounding the trench. If the tem- 
porary road surface is not placed the first day, 
then as soon as directed by the Highway Su- 
perintendent, the gravel sub-base shall be ex- 
cavated to the required grade in order to place 
one and one-half (1V6) inches of temporary 
bituminous surface. The temporary pavement 
shall be placed and raked to a uniform sur- 
face, rolled to the required thickness and to 
a grade that will match the existing 
bituminous road surface. 

The Permittee shall maintain the temporary 
surfacing and shall promptly fill with similar 
material any depressions and holes that may 
occur so as to keep the surfacing in a safe and 
satisfactory condition for traffic. Temporary 
resurfacing must be a minimum of one and 
one-half (l 1 /^) inches compacted thickness and 
may consist of either so-called "Cold Patch" 
or plant mixed hot-asphalt aggregate, all as 
produced in accordance with the standard 
specifications of the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Works. The bituminous con- 
crete surface shall not be placed until the ex- 
piration of 30 days from the date of comple- 
tion of the temporary surface. The temporary 
sub-base shall be excavated to the grade re- 
quired by these by-laws prior to placement of 
the bituminous concrete surface. 

Under Section 8, Construction Standards, by deleting 
Subsection 8.13, Bituminous Concrete Pavement 
Replacement in its entirety and substituting the 
following: 

8.13 Restoration of Permanent Paving The Per- 
mittee shall remove and dispose of, in accor- 
dance with acceptable construction standards, 
all excavated material before proceeding with 
the remainder of the work and shall 
thoroughly compact the surface of the sub- 
base. Any broken or irregular edges of existing 
pavements shall be cut away in straight lines 
as directed by the Highway Superintendent, 
leaving a solid vertical face. The bituminous 
concrete base and top shall be laid and roll- 
ed in two (2) courses. The binder (base course) 
shall not be less than the existing roadway 
base course and shall not be less than two (2) 
inches in depth and the top course shall be 
one and one-half (V/£) inches in depth. The 



minimum total thickness of both courses, 
measured after rolling, shall be three and one- 
half (3 V& ) inches. The base course of the per- 
manent pavement shall be placed and careful- 
ly raked to minimum surface and thoroughly 
rolled to the required thickness. Before plac- 
ing the base course of the permanent pave- 
ment, the edge of the original bituminous sur- 
facing shall receive an application of approved 
asphalt emulsion so that the new pavement 
material may be properly bonded to the ex- 
isting pavement. All seams shall be sealed 
with an approved emulsified liquid asphalt 
and sand. The top course of the permanent 
paving shall be placed to a grade that will 
match the existing bituminous surface after 
rolling. The permanent paving shall not 
overlap the existing pavement and shall not 
have to be applied with a mechanical spreader 
unless otherwise directed by the Highway Su- 
perintendent. The Permittee shall furnish, 
place, grade, and compact Bituminous Con- 
crete Pavement of Class I Type 1-1 as shown 
and specified in the latest Massachusetts State 
Department of Public Works Standard Speci- 
fications for Highways and Bridges. Unless 
otherwise approved by the Highway Super- 
intendent, a full width overlay will be re- 
quired if greater than 50% of the roadway 
pavement width will be disturbed. In these 
cases, pavement overlay shall consist of one 
and one -half (1V6) inches of dense graded 
bituminous concrete and shall extend at least 
30 feet beyond the street opening. Excavations 
shall be made in open cut. Tunneling will be 
allowed by special permission of the Super- 
intendent. All excavations and trenches shall 
be braced and sheathed when necessary as re- 
quired by OSHA specifications. Street open- 
ings shall be maintained by the Permittee for 
a period of two (2) years from the date of com- 
pletion. No additional permits shall be issued 
to the permittee or contractor who has any 
outstanding unmaintained street openings. 
After a new full width permanent surface is 
laid, street surface openings shall be pro- 
hoibited for a period of 3 years for major and 
minor arterial roads and 2 years for collector 
and local roads, except in cases where a 
variance is obtained pursuant to Section 14 
of these by-laws. The list of streets as classified 
by the Highway Superintendent shall be kept 
on file at that Highway Department. All per- 
manent pavement markings, including but 
not limited to crosswalks, traffic and center 
lines that are obliterated or damaged during 
the construction shall be repainted by or 
under the direction of the Highway Super- 
intendent at the expense of the Permittee. 



Under Section 8, Construction Standards, by delet- 
ing Subsection 8.16, Concrete Sidewalk Replacement 

and substituting in its place the following: 



27 



8.16 Concrete Sidewalk Replacement Cement 
concrete sidewalks shall be repaired by mak- 
ing a new concrete block or blocks through 
the trench passes. Pre-formed expansion 
joints, when deemed necessary, will be install- 
ed against buildings, walls, steps, foundations 
or existing concrete blocks. The new cement 
concrete square shall consist of Entrained 
Class "A" (3500 p.s.i.) mix. All concrete must 
be cured by convering all material in accor- 
dance with acceptable construction standards 
or as directed by the Highway Superinten- 
dent. All walks shall be laid over a minimum 
of twelve (12) inches of well compacted gravel. 
Cement concrete shall be treated with silicone 
or linseed oil sealer for salt damage 
prevention. 

5. By deleting Section 16, Municipal Department, and 
substituting in its place the following: 

Section 16 Municipal Department 

Municipal Departments of the Town of 
Chelmsford shall be exempt from the fees 
associated with this By-Law, but shall conform 
to all other aspects of this by-law. 

6. Under Section 1 Permit by adding the following 
Subsections: 

1.9.1 All construction work performed under Ar- 
ticle V shall be performed by a contractor 
licensed by the Highway Superintendent. 

1.9.2 Contractors licensed to perform work under 
Article V shall carry Comprehensive Public 
Liability with minimum limits as follows: 

a) Bodily Injuries- 
$100,000 per person, 
$300,000 aggregate 

b ) Property Damage- 
$100,000 per occurrence 

Contractor shall deliver a current Certificate 
of Insurance to the Highway Superintendent 
before performing work under this Article and 
shall post a $5,000 performance bond with 
the Town securing work to be performed 
within the public right of way. On projects 
where the Highway Superintendent deter- 
mines that the cost of construction is $10,000 
or greater, the contractor shall post a perfor- 
mance bond payable to the Town securing 
100% of the construction cost. The bond shall 
be released upon approval of the work by the 
Highway Superintendent. 

1.9.3 Violations of the provisions of Article V shall 
result in the revocation, by the Superinten- 
dent, of the contractor's license to perform 
work in the Town of Chelmsford. 



Richard Codling asked for a point of order. Due to the 
fact that Town Meeting was going to be history because 
of the new charter he wanted to submit a list to the Town 
Clerk, of those voters in attendance, who would be inter- 
ested in becoming Town Meeting Members. Town Clerk 
Mary St. Hilaire, explained that the members had to take 
out nomination papers which would become available at 
her office on June 1st. The filing deadline would be August 
1st and that 25 certified signatures would be required. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Chairman of the Recreation 
Commission, Robert Charpentier, moved that the Town 
vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the Great 
and General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to enact Special Legislation establishing a Recreation Com- 
mission Self-supporting Service Revolving Fund for the pur- 
pose of operating self-supporting recreation services, pay- 
ing employee salaries, and purchasing equipment, in 
general conformity with the provisions of Mass. General 
Laws, Chapter 44 Section 53D. 

Bernard Lynch explained this would allow the recrea- 
tion to set up a $10,000 revolving fund and pay the salaries 
out of that fund. The Finance committee is in favor of the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Norman LeBrecque wanted to reconsider article 21. He 
questioned how this by-law would effect the sewer construc- 
tion and the average homeowner. It was explained that this 
does not effect the homeowner at all. It will only apply 
to the developers of subdivisions. The motion was with- 
drawn to reconsider. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Selectman Johnson explained 
that this would prevent future stores from being able to 
add automatic amusement devices. Due to a number of 
complaints in neighborhoods where these stores are with 
the devices, the Board felt it would be in the best interest 
of the Town to ban any further licensing. Presently any 
stores who have these devices would be grandfathered. This 
is to prevent any future requests. A lengthy discussion 
followed. A number of voters spoke against the article. 
Richard Jerome, Norman LeBrecque, Gregory Jones, Barry 
Balan. Selectman Johnson moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion carried to stop debate. The Moderator then 
asked for a voice vote on the article, which left the chair 
in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. 
(see warrant for wording) 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee Barbara Ward explained that this was a by-law 
already in the town. The School Committee wanted to ad- 
dress the issue of motor vehicles on the school property. 
Therefore they were adding sections A, B, and C. The issue 
was raised because of a safety and liability insurance fac- 
tor. A number of voters spoke against the article. The con- 
cern was that of the issue of skateboarding. Barbara Ward 
explained that the Town would be held responsible if any 
one injured themselves on a skateboard. Jacob Sartz spoke 
against the article. As did Richard Jerome, Elias Safdie, 
Linda Allen. Sam Poulton spoke in favor. David McLachlan 
moved to delete Item J from the By-law. He felt that he 
or any one else should be able to use the grounds while 
school was in session. Evelyn DesMarais and John Conrad 



28 



spoke against this motion to amend. After more discussion 
Scott McCaig moved the question to stop debate. Motion 
Carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to delete Item J, motion defeated. The Moderator ask- 
ed for further discussion on the main motion. Scott McCaig 
moved the question to stop debate. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
article. Motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the School Committee, Barbara Ward mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, Ar- 
ticle IX, School Building and Grounds, by deleting Sec- 
tion 1, "Certain Uses of School Grounds Prohibited" in 

its entirety and substituting the following: 

SECTION 1: Certain Uses of School Grounds 
Prohibited 

The use of school grounds for the following activities 
is prohibited except where the user receives written 
authorization from the Superintendent or his designee: 

A) Operation of any uninsured or unregistred motor- 
ized vehicle, including, but not limited to, aut- 
omobiles, trucks, motorcycles, mini-bikes, snow- 
mobiles, and all -terrain vehicles. 

B) Racing of motor vehicles including, but not 
limited to automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, mini- 
bikes, snowmobiles, and all -terrain vehicles. 

C) Operation of any motor vehicle, including, but not 
limited to automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, mini- 
bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, off the 
driveways and parking areas. 

D) Repair and maintenance of any vehicle. 

E) Horseback riding. 

F) Camping. 

G) Golfing. 

H) Powered model airplane or rocket activities. 

I) Skate Boarding. 

J) Any non-school related use of school grounds while 
school is in session. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Selectman Henrick R. Johnson, 
moved that the Town vote to accept the following mention- 
ed streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
by their reports duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk: 

1. Armand Drive 

2. Poplar Lane 

3. Wiggin Street 

Providing all of the construction of the same meets with 
the requirement of the Board of Selectmen, and subject 
to the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met and authorize the Board of 



Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or per- 
manent easements, and any property in fee simple, with 
trees thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road im- 
provements, and move that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of six ($6.00) to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as a result of any such taking: and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

Selectman Johnson explained that the streets originally 
listed Michael's Drive, Sara Lane and Scotty Hollow Drive, 
bonds have not been released because the streets are not 
yet completed. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 Selectman Johnson moved to dis- 
miss this article. Due to litigations going on and it would 
be premature for the town to vote on the article. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article to withdraw. 
Motion carried, unanimously, (see warrant for wording) 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion, John P. Emerson moved that the Town vote to amend 
Section 5.1- Private Sewer Extension, of the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission Betterment Assessment and Sewer 
Privilege Fees, dated September 18, 1986, as prepared by 
Weston & Sampson Engineers, Inc. , copies of which are 
on file with the Office of the Board of Selectmen, and Town 
Clerk, by deleting in line 12 of Section 5.1 the letter "s" 
in the word "Sections" and the words "and 4.3". 

Norman Lebrecque asked for an explanation. John 
Emerson explained that this is a change in the current rules 
and regulations. It would require a private developer or 
a person other than the Town of Chelmsford who constructs 
a sewer extension to the public sewer system to pay fee at 
the time of the connection. The Moderator asked for more 
discussion. Hearing none, he asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion John Emerson asked to dismiss this article. The ac- 
tion already took place under article 8 of the Special Town 
Meeting of April 24th. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the dismissal. Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 Selectman Henrick Johnson and 
Chairman of the Conservation Commission, James McBride 
moved that the Town vote to accept the Special Legisla- 
tion dated November 30, 1987 entitled "An Act to Establish 
the Chelmsford-Carlisle Regional Conservation District 
in the Town of Chelmsford and Carlisle" a copy of which 
is on file in the Office of the Conservation Commission of 
the Town of Chelmsford, said Special Legislation creating 
a Conservation District to encompass the property purchas- 
ed by the Town of Chelmsford and the Town of Carlisle 
known as the Cranberry Bogs as described in a deed to the 
Town of Chelmsford, recorded in Middlesex North district 
Registry of Deeds, Book 3841, Page 244, and to the Town 
of Carlisle recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Book 3841, Page 268. 



29 



James McBride explained that this is the last step in go- 
ing to the State Legislation. If this is voted it could free 
up $463,000.00 for the Town of Chelmsford. He publicly 
thanked Judy Hass for all the work she has done. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 The Moderator read the article 
and asked for the Planning Board's recommendation. Ann 
McCarthy read the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing on April 3, 
1989 and voted in favor (6-0) to see if the Town will amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning by-law by deleting Article V. Defini- 
tions "Lot Area" and substituting in its place the following: 

Lot, area. The horizontal area of the lot exclusive of any 
area in a street or recorded way open to public use. At least 
eighty (80) percent of the lot area required for zoning com- 
pliance shall be contiguous land other than that under any 
water body, bog, swamp, wet meadow, marsh, or other 
wetland, as defined in Section 40, Chapter 131, G.L. as 
amended. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the article. James McBride 
of the Conservation explained that the Conservation ask- 
ed for the Planning Board's co-operation on amending their 
by-laws to reflect this information. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32 Chairman of the Conservation 
Commission, James McBride, moved that the Town vote 
to amend the General By-law Article XI General Wetland 
By-Law as follows: 

1. Under Section 8 amend the subtitle to read "Sec- 
tion 8 Relationship to Chapter 131 Section 40 and 
310CMR" and amend the text by adding the 
following: 

"All reference in the by-law to Chapter 131 Section 
40 shall include the provisions of regulations pro- 
mulgated pursuant to said statute as codified in 
310CMR." 

2. Under Section 3: Notice of Intent by deleting the 
last paragraph in its entirety and substituting in its 
place the following: 

"Copies of the Notice of Intent shall be sent by the 
applicant, at the same time, by certified mail to all 
parties in interest. Parties in interest shall mean the 
petitioner, abutters, owners of land directly opposite 
on any public or private street or way, and abutters 
to abutters within 300 foot of the property line of 
the petitioner or the boundary of the wetland area 
under consideration, whichever is greater all as they 
appear on the most recent applicable tax list, not 
withstanding that the land of any such owner is 
located in another city or town." 



James McBride explained that the first section adopts 
the new Wetland By-laws of the state and that the second 
section will mean that all abutters in a 300 foot radius will 
be notified just like all other boards do. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommended the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33 Selectman Henrick Johnson 
moved to dismiss this article because it falls under the 
jurisdiction of the Recreation Commission because of the 
adoption of the Charter. Motion carried, unanimously to 
dismiss. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34 Chairman of the Trash Advisory 
Committee Barbara Scavezze moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-laws Article VIII Waste Disposal 
by deleting Section 1 Dumping, in its entirety and 
substituting in its place the following: 

SECTION 1 Dumping 

a) It shall be unlawful for any person to dump any 
refuse or other solid waste as defined in General 
Laws Chapter 16 Section 18 on either public or pri- 
vate property other than an area approved and 
licensed by the Board of Health or the Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering. Violators of 
this by-law shall be punishable by a fine of $300.00 
for each offense and shall be required to remove the 
illegally dumped, refuse and dispose of in accor- 
dance with town, state and federal regulations. Any 
violator shall be responsible for all costs and ex- 
penses incurred in the removal and disposal of said 
waste. Said penalties shall be cumulative with fines 
and penalties under any federal or state criminal 
or civil statute. 

Barbara Scavezze asked Raymond Gatti to explain the 
article. Raymond Gatti explained that the present by-law 
is outdated and that this by-law would enable the town to 
enforce a fine if violators are found. The Finance commit- 
tee recommended the article. Scott McCaig moved to 
amend the article by increasing the fee to be $500.00. Town 
Counsel James Harrington explained that the Committee 
originally wanted the figure to be $500.00 but statute would 
only allow the limit to be $300.00. Scott McCaig withdrew 
his motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35 Selectman Henrick Johnson 
moved to dismiss the article. The matter of the article is 
now addressed in the Charter. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the motion. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36 Selectman Henrick Johnson 
moved that the town vote to transfer the care, custody, 
management, and control of Center School from the School 
Committee to the Board of Selectmen for another 
municipal purpose in accordance with General Law 
Chapter 40, Section 15 A. Said school being shown a plan 
entitled "Compiled Plan of Land Prepared for the Town 
of Chelmsford; Scale 1" = 100', October 1981, Fleming, 
Bienvenu, Associates, Inc.". 



30 



Selectman Johnson explained that the Town had an 
opportunity to enter into a contract with an agency in- 
terested in renting the property. The Board of Selectmen 
also have a re-opener clause added to the contract as the 
School Committee's requested in case the School Commit- 
tee did in fact need the school at a later time. He asked 
the body for their support in the passage of the article. The 
Finance Committee also recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37 William Dalton explained now 
that the Charter will be in effect there is no need to have 
this article and he moved to withdraw or defeat this arti- 
cle. A discussion followed. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote. Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 38 William Dalton asked for this 
article to be withdrawn or defeated. Motion defeated by 
voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Dwight Hayward moved that the Town vote to in- 
struct the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of $754,149.00 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate. A discussion followed. It was explained that in 
order to be able to set the tax rate the Body had to vote 
this figure. The Moderator asked for a voice vote. Motion 
carried unanimously. The Moderator seeking no further 
business at hand declared the meeting closed. The Meeting 
adjourned at 11:05 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 12, 1989 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 
PM at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 157 represen- 
tatives present. 

The Moderator went over the town meeting procedures. 
He explained that the body had a copy of the motions to 
be acted upon during the meeting. If any representative 
wanted to amend the motion then they could do so in 
writing and a vote would be taken on the amendment. If 
passed, a vote would be required on the main motion as 
amended. Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Select- 
man Towle then moved that the reading of the entire war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 



The Moderator explained that Town Counsel was asked 
to give an opinion at this meeting concerning the conflict 
of interest in regards to town meeting members voting on 
issues. He then proceeded to read the opinion of Town 
Counsel James Harrington which was addressed to Dennis 
McHugh, as follows: 

"Pursuant to your request for an opinion relative to the 
potential conflict of interest of a town meeting member 
in voting on any issue in which he has an interest, pecuni- 
ary or otherwise, the following is rendered. 

The conduct of public officials and employees is 
regulated by Massachusetts General laws, Chapter 268 A. 
Specific sections of this Chapter cover the conduct of a 
municipal employee. A municipal employee is defined by 
Section (I) (g) as "a person performing services for or 
holding an office, position, employment, or membership 
in a municipal agency, whether by election, appointment, 
contract of hire or engagement, whether serving with or 
without compensation, on a full or part-time, intermittent 
or consultant basis but excluding (1) elected members of 
a town meeting and (2) members of a charter commission 
established under Article LXXXIX of the Amendments 
to the Constitution." 

By definition all elected town meeting members are 
specifically exempted from the provision of Chapter 268A, 
the conflict of interest statute. As they are exempt from 
the provisions of this Chapter a town meeting member will 
not be found to have a conflict of interest on any issue at 
town meeting and may deliberate and vote on all matters 
regardless of any personal interest he may have in the sub- 
ject matter. 

This office has conferred with Stuart A. Kaufman, 
Esquire, General Counsel to the State Ethics commission 
who has concurred with this opinion with the caveat that 
any elected or appointed town official or other municipal 
employee should designate the capacity in which they are 
addressing town meeting prior to speaking, as elected town 
meeting member or in their capacity as a town official." 

Robert Sexton precinct 9, asked for a point of order. He 
wanted the opinion to be incorporated into the town 
meeting records. The Moderator assured him that by read- 
ing the opinion to the body that the clerk would indeed 
record the opinion in its entirety. 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Towle moved that the 
Town vote to transfer and appropriate from free cash in 
the treasury the sum of $250,000 to Line Item 59 Fire 
Department Salary. 

Selectman Johnson explained that this was the ratifica- 
tion of the Fire Department's union contract. After many 
months of arbitration, both sides felt that it was in the best 
interest of the town to ratify the contract and avoid any 
additional months of further arbitration. He explained the 
language of the contract the first year is a 5% raise broken 
down 3% the first 6 months and 2% the next six months. 
The second year is 2% the first 6 months and 3% the se- 
cond six months. The third year is a 4% raise. 



31 



The Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for any discussion. James Doukszewicz 
asked if the figure shown was the full amount of the con- 
tract or is this the amount after the deductions? Town 
Manager, Bernard Lynch said it was the full amount of the 
contract. Harry Foster precinct 2, asked for the actual 
breakdown of the figures. Town Manager Bernard Lunch 
explained $130,000 of the figure is the amount needed for 
the retro-active pay for the last fiscal year that there was 
a contract. The remaining $120,000 is for the end of this 
fiscal year of June 30th. A question was raised on where 
the funding was going to come from for this article and 
the next article? Mr. Lynch explained that there is $996,000 
in free cash already raised, the money will come from there. 
For the future years the money will have to be raised and 
appropriated. The Moderator asked for a voice vote. 
George Merrill precinct 2 asked for a point of order. He 
wanted all votes taken on warrant articles to be by roll call, 
due to people being in the hall are not all voting represen- 
tatives. The Moderator explained that when a voice vote 
is taken he will determine if a hand count is needed. The 
body also has the privilege of questioning his judgement 
as long as seven other members question his call. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum 
of $535jg00.00 from free cash in the Treasury to the 
Chelmsford School Department line item titled "Total 
School Department." 

Chairman of the School Committee Barbara Ward asked 
permission to allow Thomas Carrol, a non-resident to be 
able to speak to the body if necessary to answer questions 
about the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried. She explained that the figures shown is 
what is needed to balance the School Department's bud- 
get after all the cuts have been made and contracts settl- 
ed. The Finance Committee supported the article. A dis- 
cussion took place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate (1) the sum 
of $88,703 from Free Cash in the Treasury and (2) the sum 
of $11,297 received from the state as a result of the flood 
in 1986 to Line item #106, Waste Collection Expenses. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this was 
the additional money needed for the Solid Waste Collec- 
tion (Recycling Program). The program had started in July, 
at that time an estimate was given on the expense of col- 
lecting recyclable items throughout the Town. The program 
itself is successful, however more money is needed at this 
point to continue the process. The Finance committee sup- 
ported the article. A question was raised concerning Ber- 
nard Lynch who is a non-resident speaking without first 
obtaining permission from the body. The Moderator ex- 
plained that this was addressed in the charter. Any depart- 
ment head including the Town Manager are allowed to 
speak in order to explain an article. Roger Blomgren asked 
for support of this article. He felt that the recyclable pro- 



gram was working, and less tonnage of trash was being 
hauled away and that the savings may be small at this 
point, but at least it is a positive start on trying to curb 
future expenses. A question was raised on how much ton- 
nage is recyclable from the weekly trash pickup? Bernard 
Lynch gave some estimated figures. The town has averaged 
11,050 tons of solid waste per month over the last three 
months. The bi-weekly recyclable pickup has averaged bet- 
ween 228-230 tons of recyclables. The bulk item week gen- 
erated 65 tons of trash. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, he then went on to article 4 but stop- 
ped to make a point of order. Article 3 required a %'s vote 
or a unanimous voice vote, therefore he had to return to 
article 3 to justify the vote. The Moderator attempted 
another voice vote, which left the chair in doubt. The 
following tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: 
Marc Vanderbulcke, Howard Hall, Helen Manahan, John 
Hanlon, Stanley Norkunas, and Tom Mills. Result of the 
hand count: Yes 132; No 18; %'s is 100, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum 
of $13,088.00 from free cash in the Treasury to line item 
50, Treasurer/Collection Salary. 

Selectman Johnson spoke in favor of the article, he ex- 
plained that this was the amount needed for payment of 
sick days for a retired Town Employee. The employee had 
worked 26 years for the Town and according to the Per- 
sonnel Board By-law, any accumulated sick time is paid 
for at the time of retirement. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the article only because it was a by-law. They hope 
that in the future this will not be necessary. A discussion 
took place. A number of the Town meeting Members spoke 
for and against the article. Scott McCaig made a motion 
to move the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. The Mod- 
erator asked for a voice vote on the article, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from free 
cash in the Treasury the sum of $7,845.00 to line item 40 
Selectmen Salaries. 

Selectman Johnson explained that the Town has adopted 
the position of Town Manager as stated in the Charter and 
this is the amount needed to fund it. Due to the Town 
already being three months into the fiscal year this is for 
the remaining nine months. The Finance Committee is in 
favor of the article. Jeffrey Stallard precinct 2, read a let- 
ter of opposition that was in the Merrimack Valley Adver- 
tiser. He asked why the salary was so high. Selectman 
Johnson explained that the Screening Committee had set 
up the criteria, before the final applicants were chosen. 
They were seventy-two original applicants and after due 
process they were narrowed down to five applicants. The 
committee chose three finalists and presented them to the 
Board of Selectmen for their final choice. Bernard Lynch 
was chosen unanimously by the Board of Selectmen. The 
Selectmen surveyed surrounding Towns with a population 
like Chelmsford's and the average salary was $66,939.80. 
He felt if any of the other applicants had been chosen then 



32 



the salarv wouldn't have been an issue. The Board felt Ber- 
nard Lvnch deserved the job of town Manager because he 
qualified for it. Not because Bernard Lynch was the prior 
Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen. A number 
of the Town Meeting members spoke in favor of the arti- 
cle. Henrv Sullivan moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. The 
Moderator attempted a voice vote on the article, which fail- 
ed. The Tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. 
The result of the hand count was: Yes 140: No 4; '3 s is 
96 the motion carried. 



Town Counsel James Harrington explained that this was 
land the Cemetery commissioners wanted to purchase. An 
offer has been made to the owner of the 5.000 sq ft piece 
of land. However, an agreement hasn't been reached vet. 
The Commissioners are now in the process of petitioning 
the Middlesex County Commissioners. Once an agreement 
has been made, then the article will be placed on a future 
town meeting Warrant for consideration. The Finance 
Committee recommended the dismissal. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to dismiss, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the town vote to dismiss Article 6 in its entirety. 

James Harrington Town Counsel explained that the Plan- 
ning Board wanted to be able to further study this zoning 
bylaw definition change, and would bring it back for a vote 
at the annual meeting. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously 



UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the town vote pursuant to General laws Chapter 82, 
Section 21, that public convenience and necessity require 
that a portion of Brook Street, as hereinafter described shall 
be discontinued and all public rights in any and all por- 
tions of said Street, and or town ways relative to said street 
shall be henceforth discontinued and abandoned: said 
street is more particularly described as follows: 

That portion of Brook Street as shown on a plan entitled 
"Proposed Discontinuance Brook Street" on file with the 
Town Clerk. 

And mow that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectman for consideration to be determined to con- 
vey and transfer all right, title and interest, if any. held 
by the Town in the above parcel of land located on the 
discontinued portion of said way road to the owners abut- 
ting said property. 

Selectman Johnson stated that the orginal Brook Street 
as laved out 100 years ago abuts Leonard MacElvoy's land, 
and he asked Mr. MacElvoy to come forward and explain 
the article. Leonard MacElroy explained why he wanted 
the road discontinued. It was formerly owned by Deacon 
David Perham over 100 years ago. In 1889 a strip of land 
was surveyed as being 32 feet wide and 220 feet long which 
lead to an area called Perham Park. The park was a gift 
to the town that was never accepted. Since David Perham 
passed away, nobody paid the taxes on the land. The piece 
of land known as Perham Park has long been disposed of 
by the town. Mr. MacElroy wants to get the strip of land 
left, back on the tax rolls. The strip is to be divided in half. 
He will take the half which abuts his property and the other 
half will go to John Gioumbakis, the abutter on the other 
side of the strip of land. The Finance committee recom- 
mended the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to dismiss Article 8 in its entirety. 



UNDER ARTICLE 9 the Moderator read the article and 
a discussion took place. Town Manager Bernard Lynch ex- 
plained that the Town did vote a balanced budget at the 
time of the Annual Town Meeting. However, in July after 
the fiscal year had already begun, the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts took away 1.2 million dollars of anticipated 
funding. This immediately threw the Town's budget out 
of balance. This has prevented certifying a tax rate and 
the Town had to go back into the budget and find ways 
to make it balance. The only way to make it balance is to 
cut or get more revenue. Difficult decisions had been made. 
He tried to spread the reduction around so that not just 
one department was cut. Also to avoid citizens feeling that 
scare tactics were being used to prove a point that money 
wasn't available. The figures that appear are the result of 
the effort made. He asked for support of this article so that 
the 1990 budget can be balanced in order to be able to 
move on and start working on the 1991 budget and hopeful- 
ly eliminate some of the difficult decisions in the future. 
The Finance Committee supported the article. These are 
the figures needed to balance the budget. Richard 
DeFreitas precinct 2, moved that line item 107 in article 
8 be discussed and voted on separately. The Finance com- 
mittee was against the motion. 

They feel that the article should be voted on as 
presented. There was no need to have any separate discus- 
sion or vote. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion defeated. James DeProfio precinct 2, expressed that 
the School Department cannot afford to take any further 
cuts in the future and that this should be the final cut. 
A question was raised concerning if the Departments had 
a choice on where the cuts are to be made. Mr. Lynch said 
that they did. Richard DeFreitas precinct 2, expressed that 
he felt unnecessary cuts were being made in the teaching 
personnel and not cutting back any administrative person- 
nel. Barbara Ward Chairman of the School Committee ex- 
plained that the administrative has in fact been cut. The 
committee did consider all the personnel needed in order 
to maintain a school system. Samuel Poulten, School Com- 
mittee member, stated that the budget is voted on at open 
sessions of the School Committee Meetings. People are 
allowed at that time to express where and what exactly 
should be cut. The School Committee has to come up with 
a bottom line figure which is the figure needed to run the 
department. The figure shown is what will be minus from 
the bottom line figure. If voted then the committee will 
decide further on where exactly the cuts will be made. 
Cheryl Boss explained that the State of Massachusetts has 
a law which allows only the five members of the School 
Committee to decide where the cuts are to be made, regard- 



33 






less on where the Town Meeting Body wants them made. 
The School Committee depends on the professional peo- 
ple that they hire to assist them with this process. 

William Dalton precinct 8, asked where the $50,000.00 
cut is going to be made in the Fire Department budget? 
If the contractual agreements are involved, how are they 
going to be addressed? Mr. Lynch said he would try to ex- 
plain without getting into the specifics of bargaining. It 
was the Board's intention to try and cut back on overtime 
and that would involve the sporatic closing of the West Fire 
Station. Mr. Dalton asked if the Board intended to violate 
the contract? It was not intended, Mr. Lynch stated. After 
the Special Mr. Lynch wants to sit down and discuss the 
facts. Mr. Dalton felt it should have been discussed prior. 
Mr. Lynch said that they couldn't because they didn't have 
any definite cuts in the budget. Once it's done they will 
sit down and try to work those things out. The Board wants 
to avoid layoffs and go for just technical things. Mr. Dalton 
asked if the Town was looking for new revenue then why 
was the Town classified the way it was. Selectman Brad 
Emerson replied that it doesn't matter what vote the Board 
of Selectmen take on the tax classification, whatever ratio 
is determined a vote is not going to bring in any new 
revenue, it just puts the source in different categories. Mr. 
Dalton felt that the Town should classify the businesses 
higher like some of the surrounding cities and towns. There 
wouldn't be any need for an override. The businesses would 
be paying for the services provided to them by the Towm. 
Scott McCaig precinct 1. wanted to delete Line Item 16 
Elections, from the article. He felt it was important for the 
voters to vote at the polls. If any more money is cut then 
the voters won't have the opportunity to do so. The Finance 
Committee was against the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion, motion defeated. Susan 
Olsen precinct 2, asked a question concerning the Traffic 
and Safety line item. She wanted the bodv to be made 
aware of the projects being cut. and asked for an explana- 
tion to be given. Mr. Lynch explained the S15.000.00 is the 
fee for the shared Regional Traffic Engineer thru XMAC. 
The $45,000.00 are funds that were appropriated for ongo- 
ing projects that will simply be terminated at this time. 
The specific areas that will receive less attention right now 
are Chelmsford Center. Less money will be on hand for the 
intersections of Acton & Parker Road and Boston Road and 
Summer Street. On Boston Road and Summer Street, he 
hoped that the town might get a private developer who is 
doing work in the area to make a contribution to imple- 
ment the plans that the Town has prepared. At this time 
John Emerson precinct 3, moved the question to stop 
debate. A point of order was made that speaker was try- 
ing to be heard prior to the motion, the Chair did not 
recognize her. Mr. Emerson withdrew his motion in order 
to allow the speaker the floor. Bonnie Foster precinct 2, 
questioned the closing of the West Fire Station and the safe- 
ty issue on doing so. Mr. Lynch explained that the goal he 
has for all stations is the minimum response time of three 
minutes. The reason the West is being considered is because 
it can be easily accessed from the North Fire Stadon. Center 
Station and some cases the South Station. It's the one with 
the minimum impact to the residents of that area. The 
time delay would not be 3 minutes to ten minutes, but in 
the area of 3 minutes to 6 minutes. He's hoping to be able 
to work with the unions on the sporadic closing. She asked 



when would the closing be. is there a specific time? Mr. 
Lynch said no specific time, that still has to be worked out. 
It will be based upon when a shift is not being filled then 
it would simply not be filled. John Emerson moved the 
question. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice on 
the article, motion carried and read as follows: 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote to 
reconsider the fiscal 1990 Annual Town budget, approved 
as Article 14 at 1989 Annual Town Meeting by decreasing 
the following departmental accounts as follows: 

Line Item Decrease 

5. Assessors $10,000.00 

16. Elections 2,759.00 

32. Planning Board 450.00 

35. Public Buildings 6.017.00 

38. Registrars 1.193.00 

41. Selectmen 2,180.00 

45. Clerk 665.00 

51. Treasurer 1,898.00 

53. Dog Officer 5.460.00 

54. Dog Officer 650.00 

59. Fire 50.000.00 

60. Fire 8.773.00 

67. Insect Control 580.00 

68. Inspection 7.000.00 

2.000.00 

72. Police 50.000.00 

73. Police 11.720.00 

81. Traffic & Safetv 15,000.00 

45.000.00 

83. Tree Warden 1.287.00 

86. Highway 47.044.00 

90. Engineer 1.375.00 

97. Health 3.385.00 

100. Health 5.350.00 

102. Sewer 8,550.00 

103. Sewer 2.000.00 

107. School 486.440.00 

109. Nashoba Valley 29.964.00 

110. Cemetery 2.500.00 

111. Cemetery 2.500.00 

113. Cemetery 1.600.00 

115. Council on Aging 1.187.00 

120. Library 8.616.00 

123. Library 5.000.00 

127. Veterans 7.500.00 

129. Park 2.500.00 

130. Park 670.00 

133. Recreation 2.474.00 

141. County Retirement 207.667.00 

Total $1,048,954.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum 
of $5,000.00 from the Insurance Sinking Trust to line item 
=20. Liabilty Insurance, in order to reimburse the Town 
of Chelmsford's insurance carrier for payments made with- 
in the deductible provisions of said policv. 



34 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to reconsider Article 15 of the 1989 An- 
nual Town Meeting by decreasing $20,036 from the Reserve 
Fund. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. The 
Reserve Fund, is money put aside for "emergency" transfers 
that happen throughout the year. Unnecessary transfers will 
not take place. Dwight Haywood of the Finance commit- 
tee said the Finance committee supported the article. They 
must turn back money from their budget just like the other 
departments. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from free 
cash in the Treasury the sum of $3,750 to Line Item 110 
Cemetery Department Salary. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is the 
monies needed for the Cemetery Union. The Union set- 
tled after the Town Meeting ended in the Spring. They 
received a 5% increase and agreed to cut back the work 
force by 25%, from four people to three. The Finance 
Committee supported the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 the Moderator read the article 
and a discussion took place. Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved to amend the article by adding the following 
sentence to the end: "The member from each precinct shall 
not hold an elective office in the Town of Chelmsford other 
than Town Meeting Member." Selectman Ready explain- 
ed that this would force the opportunity for new faces and 
fresh ideas and avoid the public feeling that the same peo- 
ple are on all committees. The Finance Committee sup- 
ports the motion to amend. Richard DeFreitas precinct 2, 
spoke in favor of the motion to amend. Samuel Poulten 
stated the wording of his motion and wanted to add 
clarification of the wording of the article. The Moderator 
said that this couldn't be done because it dealt with the 
body of the main motion. Wiliiam Keohane precinct 8, 
explained that he is presently an elected member of the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority, which is mandated by the 
State. He felt he should be able to be on the committee 
and he moved to amend the motion. By adding: to exempt 
elected members of the Chelmsford Housing Authority 
from being excluded from serving on this committee. 
William Spence precinct 1, expressed concern about the 
motion to amend. As Constable, he too is an elected of- 
ficial and felt that he shouldn't be excluded from serving 
on a committee if he so desired. A discussion took place. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend the motion to amend (Ready's Motion), motion 
defeated. He asked for further discussion. Samuel Poulten 
of the School Committee moved to amend the main mo- 
tion. He said that four members of the School Committee 
were in favor of this motion, it reads as follows: by adding 
after the wording Town Treasurer, the Superintendent of 
Schools or his/her designee. And to clarify the wording of 
head of a large department, head of a small department, 



president of a large union, president of a small union, etc. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the motion to amend. The Moderator askd for 
a voice vote which left the chair in doubt, he asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried. Susan Olsen precinct 2, 
moved to amend the motion as amended by adding a 
member of the Finance Committee. The Finance Commit- 
tee was in favor of the motion. Selectman Ready was against 
it. He said it would defeat the purpose of the committee 
by having the same people on it. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to amend, motion defeated. 
Town Manager Bernard Lynch asked for support on the 
article. Harry Foster precinct 2 spoke against the article. 
Evelyn Thoren precinct 5, moved to delete the word im- 
plementation and word the sentence "charge to study and 
organize ways of increasing revenues to fund and supple- 
ment, etc." The Finance committee is in favor of the mo- 
tion to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. Selectman Roger Blomgren 
spoke in favor of article as amended. Robert Sexton 
precinct 9, moved to table the article. He felt that provi- 
sions are not stated on how the Town Meeting members 
are to be chosen. The Moderator explained that unless a 
date and time are established on when the article would 
be brought up again in effect the article would be defeated. 
He asked for a voice vote on the motion to table the arti- 
cle, which left the chair in doubt, he asked for a show of 
hands, motion defeated. More discussion took place. Harry 
Foster precinct 2, moved to amend the main motion as 
amended by adding this committee has this proposal placed 
in the Town Clerk's Office six weeks prior implementation 
or final decision by this committee or selectmen — or pre- 
sent it to a town meeting. The Finance Committee was not 
in favor of the motion to amend. Bernard Lynch explain- 
ed that this committee needed to act now and not wait until 
the April Town Meeting to report back before any deci- 
sions could be made. Edward Hilliard precinct 7, asked for 
a privilege motion he wanted to recess the Special Town 
Meeting for ten minutes in order for the Town Meeting 
Members to caucus among themselves and select nine 
members for the committee. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion defeated. William Logan precinct 1, 
spoke against Harry Foster's motion to amend and asked 
for suppport of the article as amended. Scott McCaig 
precinct 1, moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the motion to amend, motion defeated. David 
McLachlan precinct 6, moved the question to stop debate 
on the main motion as amended. Motion carried, 
unanimously. He then asked for a voice vote on the main 
motion as amended, it left the chair in doubt, he asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried. The article reads as 
follows: 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the town vote to in- 
struct the Board of Selectmen to form a committee charg- 
ed to study and organize ways of increasing revenues to fund 
and supplement the town's 1991 budget, said committee 
to be known as the Fiscal Planning Advisory Board, and 
to be comprised of the Town Manager, the Town Accoun- 
tant, the Town Treasurer, the Superintendent of Schools 
or his/her designee, and a Head of a large department, 
a Head of a small department, a President of a large union, 



35 



A President of a small union and one member from each 
precinct elected by that delegation of newly elected Town 
Meeting Representatives. 

Scott McCaig precinct 1, moved to adjourn the meeting 
at this time. A speaker asked for a point of order. She 
wanted to reconsider an article at this time. The Moderator 
told her that because a motion was already made to ad- 
journ, that had to be voted on first. If it is defeated then 
she can bring up whatever article she wishes. The Moder- 
ator asked for a voice vote on the motion to adjourn, mo- 
tion carried. The meeting adjourned at 10:30 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



Town Appropriations 
Reduce Rasie & Appropriate 
Transfers from Available Funds: 
Free Cash $898,386.00 

Special Revenue 11,297.00 

Prior Yr Approp. 45,000.00 

Trust Fund 5,000.00 

TOTAL 



(-$ 109,307.00) 
(-$1,068,990.00) 



(-$ 



959,683.00 
109,307.00) 



INFORMAL ORIENTATION MEETING 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE TOWN 

MEETING MEMBERS 

The Meeting was called to order at 7:45 PM at the 
McCarthy Middle School auditorium. The Moderator, 
Dennis McHugh welcomed all the newly elected Represen- 
tative Town Meeting Members. The Town voted in April 
to have a Charter for Chelmsford. This meant that there 
would now be a Town Manager and Representative Town 
Meeting. A Special Election took place on Tuesday Sep- 
tember 19th in which 18 voters were elected from each of 
the nine precincts. A total of 162 members were elected. 
There were 154 members present at the meeting. 

The Moderator then asked the members to go over the 
information that was supplied by the Town Clerk. In their 
packages were: copies of the Open Meeting Law, the War- 
rant for the STM of October 12th, the Charter, and RTM 
practices and procedures prepared by the Moderator, and 
I.D. badges. He explained that the badges are to be worn 
at all times during the meetings. Only those voters wear- 
ing the badges will be allowed to sit in the designated area 
and counted if a hand count is conducted. Temporary ones 
will be issued by the Town Clerk if a RTM member doesn't 
have theirs the night of a meeting. 

The Moderator then introduced the Town Clerk Mary 
E. St. Hilaire. The Town Clerk asked for all the RTM mem- 
bers present from precincts 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, to please rise and 
take the oath of office. On September 25th precincts 1, 3, 
5, and 8 were sworn in at the Town Office Building when 



tie breaking ballots were cast for their precincts. She then 
explained that everyone present received and signed for 
copies of the Open Meeting Law, and proceeded to go over 
certain areas of the law. If the individual precincts meet 
to discuss town meeting articles or anything pertaining to 
town business, they are subject to the Open Meeting Law 
and must post 48 hours in advance prior to any meeting. 
She urged the members to read the law so they won't be 
in any violation. 

The Moderator then introduced the Town Manager, Ber- 
nard F. Lynch. The Town Manager had passed out prior 
to the meeting a booklet explaining proposition 2V6 and 
the Town Status for FY 90 and a financial forecast up to 
FY 1994. Questions were asked concerning the Free Cash 
line item in the forecasted figures. A lengthy discussion took 
place concerning proposition 2 V£. Bernard Lynch 
explained the effects of it and what has happened to the 
town since 2V6 has been established. 

The RTM Members asked if it would be possible to 
review the STM articles. The Moderator explained that any 
explanation would have to take place the night of the 
meeting because all parties involved with an article would 
be present and would be responsible for their own 
explanation. 

Robert Sexton asked for a ruling on the Conflict of Inter- 
est Law, and how if any it would effect the RTM Members. 
It was explained that RTM Members do not come under 
this law or the Campaign Finance Law. The Town Counsel 
was requested to have an opinion on the Conflict of In- 
terest Law available for the October 12th meeting. 

The Moderator asked if there were any further questions. 
Hearing none, he reminded the RTM Members to bring 
their badges and copy of the warrant to the October 12th 
meeting. He closed the meeting at 9:30 PM. 



REPRESENTATIVE 
TOWN MEETING MEMBERS 



PRECINCT 1 




NAME 


TERM 


William R. Logan 


1993 


John P. Clancy 


1993 


Susan G. Koeckhoven 


1993 


Sandra A. Kilburn 


1993 


Barry B. Balan 


1993 


Robert P. Joyce 


1993 


Philip L. Currier 


1992 


John G. Coppinger 


1992 


Marian D. Currier 


1992 


Robert E. Olson 


1992 


Carl W. Seidel 


1992 


Scott J. McCaig 


1992 


John G. Mamalis 


1991 


Charles W Frye 


1991 


Martha McClure 


1991 


William E. Spence 


1991 


Robert M. Schneider 


1991 


Jean B. Rook 


1991 



36 



PRECINCT 2 
NAME 

Richard E DeFreitas 
George L. Merrill 
Francis G. Miskell 
Harry A. Foster 
Susan M. Olsen 
Harold I. Matzkin 
Bonnie I. Foster 
Loretta A. Gelenian 
Barry T. Bell 
George F Abley 
Kathryn A. Schmitz 
David G. Conrad 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 
Patricia A. Jamros 
Karen S. Vandenbulcke 
James A. DeProfio 
Mary Jo Welch 
Albert Leman 



TERM 

1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 



PRECINCT 5 

NAME 

Arnold J. Levering 
Barbara H. Ward 
James M. Creegan 
Wendy C. Marcks 
Kathleen F Hillman 
David P. McLaughlin 
Ronald W Wetmore 
J. Ronald Gamache 
Evelyn S. Thoren 
Dean Carmeris 
Glenn R. Thoren 
Violet R. Stone 
Steven J. Temple 
Jonathan A. Stevens 
Robert E. Brooks 
W Allen Thomas Jr. 
Frederick C. Marcks 
Catherine Brown 



TERM 

1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 



PRECINCT 3 
NAME 

Carole A. Marcotte 
D. Lorraine Lambert 
Priscilla A. Rega 
Brenda A. McDermott 
Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 
Jane S. McKersie 
John P. Emerson Jr. 
Judith Haas 
Stephen A. Gould 
Thomas P. Regan 
Michael F Curran 
Christine A. Gleason 
Cynthia M. Sullivan 
Thomas J. Welch 
Robert D. Marazzi 
Thomas E. Moran 
Pamela S. Amway 
Thomas F Carey Jr. 

PRECINCT 4 
NAME 

Ruth K. Delaney 
John T. Conrad Jr. 
Bonita Towle 
Gerald W. Pacht 
John B. Sousa Jr. 
Thomas E. Firth Jr. 
Frances T McDougall 
Lynn M. Marcella 
Linda J. Allen 
Gary R. Wilson 
Jeffrey A. Brem 
Martha W. Shelton 
Kay E. Roberts 
Donald P. Ayer 
Beverly A. Koltookian 
Daniel J. Sullivan III 
Steven B. Hadley 
Michael R. Parquette 



PRECINCT 6 



TERM 


NAME 


1993 


John W. Carson 


1993 


Raymond P. McKeon 


1993 


Margaret A. Johnsion 


1993 


Bradford O. Emerson 


1993 


Janet G. Dubner 


1993 


M. Elizabeth Marshall 


1992 


David J. McLachlan 


1992 


Aileen R. McCarthy 


1992 


Roger A. Blomgren 


1992 


Edward S. Marshall 


1992 


Martin A. Gruber 


1992 


Cherul M. Wharshafsky 


1991 


Mary E. Frantz 


1991 


Brian J. Stanton 


1991 


James A. Sousa 


1991 


Earl C. Burt 


1991 


Francis X. Roark 


1991 


John Demers 




PRECINCT 7 


TERM 


NAME 


1993 


Dennis J. Ready 


1993 


Susan J. Gates 


1993 


Edward H. Hilliard 


1993 


Joan M. Gauthier 


1993 


Bernard A. Ready 


1993 


Mark W. Gauthier 


1992 


John F Geary, Jr. 


1992 


Andrew V. Silinish 


1992 


Kathryn Brough 


1992 


Bruce A. Kunkel 


1992 


Leonard W Doolan III 


1992 


Dwight M. Hayward 


1991 


Carol A. Stark 


1991 


Frederick W Wikander 


1991 


Nicholas G. Gavriel 


1991 


Charles A. Cook 


1991 


Stratos G. Dukakis 


1991 


Margaret A. Schloeman 



TERM 

1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 



TERM 

1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1992 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 



37 



PRECINCT 8 




NAME 


TERM 


Walter A. Cleven 


1993 


Stuart G. Weisfeldt 


1993 


Doris J. Mahoney 


1993 


William P. Keohane 


1993 


William F. Dalton 


1993 


Richard J. Day 


1993 


Cynthia A. Walcott 


1992 


Carrie A. Steiman 


1992 


Henry E. Sullivan 


1992 


Richard P. Greska 


1992 


Daniel W Burke 


1992 


Reginald M. Larkin 


1992 


Cheryl Adkins Boss 


1991 


Bruce J. Harper, Sr. 


1991 


Alexander W Gervais 


1991 


Peter G. Johnson 


1991 


Samuel Poulten 


1991 


Evelyn P. Bell 


1991 


PRECINCT 9 




NAME 


TERM 


Eleanor D. Abbott 


1993 


Alan R. Pajak 


1993 


John S. Fudge Jr. 


1993 


Roland E. Linstad 


1993 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


1993 


Doris A. Tereshko 


1993 


Alan L. Moyer 


1992 


Barbara J. Scavezze 


1992 


Samuel J. Brink 


1992 


Donald L. Elias 


1992 


James P. Good 


1992 


Donald N. Keirstead 


1992 


Allan T. Galpin Jr. 


1991 


Robert M. Sexton Jr. 


1991 


Cynthia J. Kaplan 


1991 


Frank R. Peterson 


1991 


Edward A. Cady 


1991 


George M. Goguen 


1991 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Dennis E. McHugh 
Term Expires 1990 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Term Expires 1990 

Board of Assessors Elected 3 Yr Term 

Diane M. Phillips, Chairman Term Expires 1990 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1992 

Richard P. Tevlin Term Expires 1991 



Cemetery Commission Elected 3 Yr Term 

Charlotte P. DeWolf, Chairman Term Expires 1990 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1992 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1991 

Cemetery Superintendent: Frank R. Peterson 

Constable Elected 3 Yr Term 

William E. Spence Term Expires 1992 

Board of Health Elected 3 Yr Term 

Mark W Gauthier, Chairman Term Expires 1990 

Paul J. Canniff, Clerk Term Expires 1992 

Paul F. McCarthy, Vice Chairman . . Term Expires 1991 
Appt. Dr. Michael Dean, 
Director: Richard J. Day 
Nurse: Judy Dunigan 

Chelmsford Housing Authority Elected 5 Yr Term 

Lynn M. Marcella Term Expires 1992 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1991 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman Term Expires 1990 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1993 

Pamela Turnbull GovApt 7/93 

Lisa Royce, Director 

Library Trustees Elected 3 Yr Term 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy, Tres Term Expires 1990 

D. Lorraine Lambert Term Expires 1990 

Janet B. Hendl, Vice Chairman . . . .Term Expires 1992 

Susan G. Cantin Term Expires 1991 

Mark W. Gauthier, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Sarah L. Warner, Sec Term Espires 1992 

Park Commission Elected 3 Yr Term 

Abolished 4/4/89 

Passage of Charter-Sec. 5-2-see DPW 

Mary P. Bennett Term Expires 1990 

Eileen M. Duffy Term Expires 1992 

Walter L. Kivlan Term Expires 1991 

Planning Board Elected 3 Yr Term 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1990 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Term Expires 1990 

Ann H. McCarthy, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

John F. McCarthy Term Expires 1992 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice Chairman . . Term Expires 1991 

James P. Good Term Expires 1991 

Christine A. Gleason, Clerk Term Expires 1991 

Clerk Joan Garland 

School Committee Elected 3 Yr Term 

Samuel Poulten Term Expires 1990 

Carol W Merriam, Vice Chairman .Term Expires 1990 

Carl A. Olsson Term Expires 1992 

Barbara H. Ward, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Wendy C. Marcks Term Expires 1992 

Selectmen Elected 3 Yr Term 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1990 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk Term Expires 1992 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman .Term Expires 1992 
Bonita A. Tbwle, Vice Chairman . . .Term Expires 1991 
Bradford O. Emerson Term Expires 1991 



38 



Sewer Commissioners Elected 3 Yr Term 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk Term Expires 1990 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 1992 

Barry B Balan, Vice Chairman 1991 

Town Treasurer/Tax Collector Elected 3 Yr Term 1990 

James R. Doukszewicz 

Tree Warden Elected 3 Yr Term 1990 

Abolished 4/4/89 

Passage of Charter-Sec. 5-2-see DPW 

Frank Wojtas 

Varney Playground Commission 
Elec ATM Vote 3 Yr Term 
Abolished 4/4/89 
Passage of Charter-Sec. 5-2-see DPW 

Donald T. Wholey Term Expires 1991 

Norbert J. McHale Term Expires 1992 

Harry J. Ayotte Term Expires 1990 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A., Chairman 
Ruth K. Delaney, M.A.A. Richard Tevlin 

Nancy L. Maher, Assistant to the Assessors 

Personnel 

Marie Ronan, Principal Clerk 
Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 

Elaine Meyers, Senior Clerk 
Elizabeth Day, Part-Time Clerk 

• Fiscal 1989 was an extremely busy year for the Assessors 
office. The state mandated re-certification program was 
completed, and final bills were sent out in the spring. Due 
to the large increase in land values this office was kept busy 
with more than usual requests from the taxpayers concer- 
ning their values. Requests for abatements increased about 
20% over the last (1986) re-certification year. 

Sincerely, 

Diane Phillips, M.A.A. 
Board of Assessors 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

ACTIVITIES 

Interments in 1989 decreased 29% making this year the 
slowest since 1972. As a recreation to the decreased activi- 
ty the Commission ordered a reduction in manpower which 
began in July, 1989. 

Master planning for future development of available land 
at Pine Ridge and Fairview cemeteries, announced last year, 
is proceeding at a satisfactory rate. This activity provides 
for the orderly and planned future layout of these two ma- 
jor town cemeteries. 

Work to expand the existing inventory of grave space is 
actively underway at Heart Pond cemetery. This area is be- 
ing prepared to be available for use in the spring of 1991. 
In the meantime minimal space is available for use in this 
cemetery. 

Work has also begun at Pine Ridge Cemetery to pro- 
vide additional burial space before the existing inventory 
runs out. A lead time of four years is planned so that space 
will become available as the existing inventory runs out. 

Future work in cemetery development contains plans to 
use a grave density of 1000 or more per acre. This com- 
pares to older developed parts of the cemetery system where 
grave density of 460 to 630 per acre can be found. 

FUNDING 

Sources of funds paid to the Town Treasurer have been 
as follows: 





1987 


1988 


1989 


Sale of Graves 


$36,245 


$48,241 


$56,035 


Interment and Other 








Fees 


12,870 


18,378 


13,156 


Foundation 








Installation 





11,792 


8,640 


Veterans' Grave 








Rehabilitation 





2,100 





Total 


$49,115 


$80,511 


$77,831 



Sale of graves increased by 8% over 1988, which appears 
to reflect a continuing industry campaign to promote pre- 
need sales of funeral services. 

Income from sales increased a total of 16% over 1988. 
Included in this increase is over $10,000 received as the 
result of an aggressive effort to collect overdue bills for 
graves previously sold. 

Interment and Other Fees decreased by 28% due prin- 
cipally to the decrease in interments in this period. This 
was partially offset by increases in some cemetery fees. 

Foundation installation also decreased in step with 
interments. 



OTHER CONCERNS 

In recognition of its environmental concerns the Com- 
mission began a program of leaf composting and wood 



39 



chipping in 1987. These efforts are now bearing fruit as 
sources of loam and replacement for bark mulch in the 
cemeteries. 

The use of road salt and sand in the town cemeteries 
has been replaced with sand only, and has resulted in 
decreased grass kill along cemetery roads and noticeably 
slowed down road deterioration. 

The Commission is encouraged by the response to its re- 
quest for volunteer help. Among the more noteable pro- 
jects are included the Girl Scout project for documenting 
the engraving on older tombstones in the town's two oldest 
cemeteries. We hope this can be accomplished before the 
ravages of time, acid rain and the like, erase them forever. 

The Commission takes this opportunity to thank the 
citizens of Chelmsford for their support in providing 
Cemeteries and associated dignified services to the 
townspeople when and as needed. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Mark Gauthier 

Vice Chairman Paul McCarthy 

Clerk Paul Canniff 

Health Department Personnel 



Director of Public Health 
Health Inspector/ Asst. 
Departmental Assistant 
Town Nurse 
Town Physician 



Richard J. Day 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Diana L. Wright 

Judith Dunigan, R.N. 

Michael Dean, M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1989 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing and 
water sampling program and positive results are being seen. 
Numerous tests have been performed by the Board of 
Health along with the issuance of one-hundred twenty-four 
septic system permits for repairs and thirty-eight septic 
system permits for new construction with an increasing 
percentage of commercial, industrial and condominium 
buildings. The Board has again instituted new regulations 
to more specifically address further protection of water 
quality in town. 

Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation Tests -47 $ 2,350 

Deep Tests -230 11,500 

Sewage Repair Permits— 124 3,100 

Sewage Construction Permits— 38 1,900 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 12,685 



Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1989 four inspections were made at new and ex- 
isting day care centers; eighty-two inspections were made 
for Chapter II Housing; eight school inspections; two- 
hundred sixty complaints received and checked; Camp 
Paul inspections; thirty bathing beaches inspections; two 
International Certificates of Vaccination, restaurant and 
retail food store inspections; one-hundred eight 
establishments in town inspected twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to en- 
force the "Right-to-Know" law for this town. Mr. Day has 
initiated a Right-To-Know program for all town employees. 
The position encompasses actions between State, Federal 
agencies, the business community and the general public. 

Household Hazardous Waste Day 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has open- 
ed up a whole new area to be monitored. A continuing 
number of incidents have required a cooperative effort be- 
tween the town and DEQE officials. It is the goal of the 
Board of Health, along with other town departments, to 
keep abreast of all current changes and updates in the 
handling and disposal of all toxic wastes and to supersede 
any state and federal standards where it would best serve 
to protect this community and its precious water supplies. 
With this in mind, the Board of Health has held a special 
Waste Oil Only Collection on June 24, 1989 and its an- 
nual Household Hazardous Waste Day on November 4, 
1989. They were both great successes, removing thirty-five 
barrels of hazardous waste, 1,700 gallons of waste oil and 
four dozen batteries from the town. 

Communicable Disease Program 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health man- 
dates that an epidemiological investigation be undertaken 
on approximately forty-eight communicable diseases. 
When a communicable disease is reported to the Health 
Department by a physician or hospital, the nurse contacts 
the person involved to ascertain if a probable source of the 
infection can be determined. In some communicable 
diseases it is necessary that food handlers or family 
members are removed from their jobs during the period 
of communicability. The follow-up report is submitted to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1989: 



Amebiasis 1 

Hepatitis B 1 

Salmonella 10 

Campylobacter Enteritis 15 

Giardiasis 2 

Fifth Disease 13 

Measles 2 

Viral Meningitis 2 

Active Tuberculosis 1 

Tuberculosis Control 42 
Program* 

•Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 



40 



The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom 
from that disease is another responsibility of the Town 
Nurse. One-hundred twenty-one mantoux (TB) tests were 
given to town residents for pre-employment and to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 
Home visits and telephone calls are made to families of ac- 
tive and some inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic basis 
to insure understanding of the illness and that adequate 
medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous medical records 
are kept and updated on residents who have a positive (TB) 
mantoux test and are receiving medication prophylactically 
and being followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest 
Clinic. 



250-5243 and make an appointment with the nurse. One- 
hundred twenty-seven children were screened for lead 
paint. 

Health Fair 

The Town's sixth Health Fair will be held on Saturday, 
April 7, 1990 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the McCar- 
thy Middle School, North Road. This will be held in con- 
junction with the Westford Health Department and be 
open to both Chelmsford and Westford residents. Free 
screenings to be offered include: blood pressure, height, 
weight, vision, glaucoma, blood sugar, blood chemistry to 
include a cardiac risk profile plus many more. Details will 
be announced in the newspapers or call the Health Dept. 
at 250-5243. 



AIDS and Venereal Disease are reported by the physi- 
cian directly to the State Department of Public Health to 
maintain patient confidentiality. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. Twenty- nine persons were immuniz- 
ed with pneumonia vaccine and seven-hundred fifty-eight 
persons were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. An ad- 
ditional two-hundred doses were given to nursing homes, 
thirty doses to school nurses for staff, ten home visits were 
made to handicapped or house-bound residents and thir- 
ty doses to McFarlin Manor and Chelmsford Arms 
residents. A total of one-thousand sixty-three doses of flu 
vaccine were administered in town, provided free by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

Several immunizations were administered to update 
students records in compliance with the Massachusetts 
School Immunization Laws and prophylactically to 
residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board 
of Health, Town Offices. 

Diabetic Screening Program 

This procedure takes a short time, involves a small sam- 
ple of blood by finger prick method, and can be done either 
fasting or two hours after meals. Residents may call the 
Health Department office and make an appointment with 
the nurse at 250-5243. 



Mammography Screenings 

Two Mammography Screenings were held at the Town 
Hall and ninety-eight residents attended. The next screen- 
ing will be held November, 1990. Call for an appointment. 

Hypnotherapy Sessions 

Two hypnotherapy sessions to Quit Smoking and one for 
Weight Loss were offered to residents. These were well at- 
tended sessions and several people reported successful 
results. 

Vial of Life Program 

The Chelmsford Health Department and Council on Ag- 
ing in conjunction with St. Joseph's Hospital, Lowell, will 
be offering the Vial of Life Program to elderly residents 
of Chelmsford and anyone else with chronic illnesses or 
medical problems, including children. This Vial of Life 
will help you provide valuable medical information to those 
responding in an emergency. 

The vial is a plastic tube which contains vital medical 
information and persons to contact in case of an emergency. 
The vial is placed inside the refrigerator on the top shelf, 
and a Vial of Life sticker is placed on the outside of the 
refrigerator on the top right corner to alert rescue squad 
personnel in the event of an emergency. 

The vials are free of charge and may be picked up at 
the Council on Aging, 75 Groton Road; the Chelmsford 
Board of Health, Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road and the 
Adams Library, Boston Road. 



Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents several 
times during the year. A nominal fee was charged and the 
dates were announced in the newspapers several weeks prior 
to the screening. Three-hundred thirty-eight residents were 
screened for cholesterol. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers free lead paint testing of 
children between ages nine months and six years. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time and involves a small sample of 
blood by finger prick method. The blood sample is then 
sent to the State lab for testing. We will forward the results 
to your physician. Residents may call the Health Dept. at 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commis- 
sioners worked diligently over the past year with Town and 
State Officials to begin work on the new elderly and fami- 
ly developments. The Commissioners held a ground break- 
ing on Sheila Avenue in February 1989 for the forty-eight 
(48) units of elderly and eleven (11) units of family. The 
elderly are all one bedroom, a 4 bedroom congregate unit 
is housed within the elderly complex. All family units are 
three bedroom with one of the units set up for a physically 
handicapped member. The elderly development is located 



41 



on Sheila Avenue. The family units are on three different 
sites: Sheila Avenue, Mill Road and the corner of James 
and John Streets. MGIA are the architects and Cresta Cor- 
poration is the Contractor for these developments. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs, as of June 
31, 1989, provide a total of 271 units of low income hous- 
ing, 140 elderly, 13 handicapped, 119 family. Five of the 
Authority's programs are funded by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts through the Executive Office of Com- 
munities & Development under Chapter 667, Chelmsford 
Arms completed in 1974, fifty-six regular units and eight 
handicapped units; the Community Residence purchased 
in 1974 for the mildly to moderately retarded, eight units; 
six condominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased in 
1984, McFarlin Manor completed in 1981, forty-three 
regular units, three handicapped units, one four-bedroom 
congregate unit which serves the "semi-independent elder- 
ly." Under Chapter 707, the Authoritys' "scattered site" pro- 
gram began in 1974, there are thirty-two units under lease 
in the private market. The Section 8 Existing Housing Pro- 
gram presently has fifty-eight certificates under lease and 
fifty- three certificates leased under the Section 8 Voucher 
Program. The Chelmsford Housing Authority year ending 
financial statement lists assets at $7,113,842, liabilities at 
$7,113,842 for all developments. All developments are for- 
mally inspected annually by maintenance and administra- 
tive staff. The Authority is especially grateful to those 
organizations which express special concern for the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority residents, and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Club for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include, Mary E. Royce, Executive 
Director, Helen Cantara, Administrative Assistant, Linda 
Dalton, Junior Clerk, Robert Trainor, Full-time Mainten- 
ance Mechanic and Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Mainten- 
ance Laborer. Regular meetings are held at McFarlin 
Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday 
each month. The Annual meeting is the first Tuesday in 
May. All meetings are opened to the public. The Chelms- 
ford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners would like 
to thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town Officials 
for their continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Thomas Carey, Chairman 

J. James Howells, Vice-Chairman 

Ellen Hargraves, Secretary 

Howard Burns 

John Donohoe 

Stratos Dukakis 

Augustine Kish 

Irene Machemer 

Robert Manning 

Charlotte Scott 



ALTERNATES 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Jerilyn Bozicas 
Stephen Dunbar 
Kevin Finnegan 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Ronald Wetmore 



Chelmsford 

Westford 

Groton 

Pepperell 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Littleton 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Westford 



Littleton 

Pepperell 

Townsend 

Westford 

Shirley 

Groton 

Chelmsford 



ADMINISTRATION 



Bernholdt Nystrom 
David McLaughlin 
Victor Kiloski 
Paul Royte 
Paula Page 
Thomas Eng 



Superintendent-Director 

Assistant Director/ Principal 

Academic Coordinator 

Guidance Director 

Special Education Coordinator 

Dean of Students 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enrollment, as 
of October 1, 1989 is as follows: 

Chelmsford 111 

Groton 47 

Littleton 27 

Pepperell 71 

Shirley 42 

Townsend 57 

Westford 88 

Tuitioned 40 



Total 



483 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 








TERM 


NAME 


TITLE EX! 


Ruth K. Delaney 


Chairman 


1990 


Robert L. Hughes 


Vice Chairman 


1993 


William P. Keohane 


Treasurer 


1991 


Lynn Marcella 


Asst. Treasurer 


1992 


Pamela A. Turnbull 


Member 

(State Appointee) 


1993 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
and provides its students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, co-op program, a high school diploma, a trade cer- 
tificate, an opportunity for further education at a college 
of their choice and job placement. 

Over the past decade, the record of employment for our 
graduates has averaged approximately 90%. Each year 
qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our Co- 
op Training Program which allows senior students to work 
in industry during their shop weeks and receive valuable 
training in their chosen fields as well as a salary. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba 
Technical High School: 



42 



Technical Programs 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts and Baking 

Data Processing 

Drafting 

Electrical 

Electronics 



Horticulture/ Landscaping 

Machine 

Medical Occupations 

Metal Fabrication 

and Welding 

Painting and Decorating 

Plumbing and Heating 

Printing 



Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, 
a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or over. 
Residents from all communities are welcome to participate 
in the many diversified courses which are offered during 
both the fall and spring semesters. This year 488 students 
enrolled in our Adult Education Program during the fall 
semester. 



The Personnel Board meets on the second Tuesday of 
each month at the Town Offices building. Special work ses- 
sions are scheduled when necessary. 

Implementation of the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter 
has affected the membership and charge of this Board. 
Prior to the Charter change, the Personnel Board consisted 
of three persons (two appointed by the Town Moderator 
and one elected by non-union Town employees) whose 
duties included administering directly the Town Person- 
nel By-Laws as those addressed issues regarding personnel 
administration practices, wages, benefits, performance 
evaluations, job descriptions and organization changes. The 
Board also reviewed position reclassifications, and was 
responsible for recommending to Town Meeting by-law 
changes designed to ensure that non-union employees' 
wages and benefits compared favorable with those of Town 
employees. 

An extensive salary survey was completed, and the Board 
developed further existing contact with personnel boards 
in other communities, exchanging information and ideas 
concerning how best to plan for the Town's personnel needs. 

After the Charter went into effect, the Board was ex- 
panded to five members (four appointed by the Town 
Manager and one elected by non-union Town employees). 
The Board assumed and continues to exercise an advisory 
rule; it no longer administers directly the Personnel By- 
Laws. Rather, it reviews all personnel actions proposed by 
the Town manager, making recommendations to him con- 
cerning those actions based upon established Town policy 
and the latest information available regarding personnel 
issues. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members 

Elizabeth L. Delaney, Chairman 

Joan M. Gauthier 

Harold I. Matzkin 

Jacqueline J. Hall 

John Demers 

Clerk 

Louise Beauchesne 



In this role, the Personnel Board supports fair, equitable 
personnel practices affecting current Town employees and 
it perpetuates Chelmsford's reputation for attracting highly 
skilled and motivated employees. 

The current Board consists of: Acting Chairman Harold 
I. Matzkin (term expires July, 1990); Joan M. Gauthier (ser- 
ving her second term, which expires January, 1992); Jac- 
queline J. Hall (term expires October, 1991); and John 
Demers (term expires October, 1991). During the past year, 
Elizabeth L. Delaney (re-elected by non-union town em- 
ployees to a term expiring June, 1991) served as Chairper- 
son of the Board until her resignation in December, 1989; 
an election to fill Ms. Delaney 's position will be held. 



43 



CHELMSFORD PLANNING BOARD 




Front Row: (left to right) Christine A. Gleason; Ann H. McCarthy, Chairman; John F. McCarthy 
Back Row: (left to right) Eugene E. Gilet; Kim J. MacKenzie; Thomas E. Firth, Jr.; James P. Good 



44 



PLANNING BOARD 

Ann H. McCarthy, Chairman 
Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice Chairman 
Christine A. Gleason, Clerk 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 
Eugene E. Gilet 
James P. Good 
John F. McCarthy 

The Chelmsford Planning Board experienced another 
very busy year in 1989, meeting regularly on the second 
and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month. In addi- 
tion, the Board held Special and Subcommittee meetings 
to address problems and concerns related to land use and 
Zoning By-Laws. The Board meetings were well attended, 
many with very lengthy agendas and standing room only 
conditions. 

The Board held Public Hearings and acted upon six sub- 
division applications as required by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 41. The Board also reviewed and acted upon 
41 applications and plans for endorsement by the Plan- 
ning Board that "subdivision approval is not required," as 
provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 41 (sec- 
tion 81). 

Acting as the special permit granting authority under 
Chapter 40A, the Planning Board held Public Hearings, 
reviewed, and acted upon: 

11 Site Plan applications (Section 1420 

5 Applications for reduction in parking 
(Section 3100) 

8 Applications for Major Business Com- 
plexes (Section 4500) 

1 Application for Retirement Facility in 
Aquifer Protection District (Section 4800) 

The Special Permits were associated with nursing home, 
bank, office, retail, hotel, commercial, industrial, and non- 
profit educational uses. 

The Planning Board collected application fees totalling 
$6,500.00 in 1989, for Special Permit and Subdivision 
applications. 

As the Town's open space becomes more scarce, the Plan- 
ning Board's role grows increasingly more difficult. While 
fewer projects were presented in 1989 than during the hous- 
ing and commercial "boom" years, greater scrutiny is re- 
quired than was necessary when prime, quality land was 
plentiful. The recent addition of municipal sewers also 
opens up areas that were previously considered unsuitable 
for development. Conversion of existing uses is also becom- 
ing more common. 

The Board expects to submit one or more articles for 
1990 Town Meeting action in response to the continuing 
need to update and improve the Zoning By-Law to meet 
current Town requirements. 

The Planning Board is sincerely grateful for the invalu- 



able assistance that we receive from the many boards, 
departments, and individuals who provide help in our deci- 
sion making process, and in the day to day operation of 
the Planning Board office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann H. McCarthy, Chairman 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Mark Gauthier, Chairperson 
Janet Hendl, Vice Chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Susan Warner, Secretary 
D. Lorraine Lambert 
Susan G. Cantin 

Collections and Circulations: Overall circulation of 
materials was up 11% in 1989 with MacKay Branch 
Library showing an increase of 37%. A new 
microfiche/film reader/printer was purchased for the 
Reference area at Adams — also a magazine index on com- 
pact disc subscribed to by the Friends of the Library. Both 
the video and compact disc collections have grown by 
popular demand. And MacKay introduced special collec- 
tions on health and recovery for families with drug pro- 
blems and another for adults over 50. Book delivery ser- 
vice to the homebound was resumed thanks to our 
volunteers and Friends. 

Programs: Children's storytime at both Adams and 
MacKay continue to be well attended. The "Hats Off sum- 
mer reading program drew a record number of par- 
ticipants. "Lit Kits" for day care/nursery schools were laun- 
ched this year with a start-up gift from Chelmsford 
Newcomers Club. A discussion series on myths and legends, 
a day-long workshop on AIDS, and a wide variety of other 
programs capped by a standing-room-only-night with Lin- 
da Weltner made this an interesting year. . 

Personnel: Ellen Rauch resigned as Director in October. 
New Director, Mary Mahoney, will join us in February, 
1990. Roger Anderson was hired to fill a part-time 
custodial position. Judith Hildebrandt resigned as 
Reference Department Head. The Library also enjoyed the 
good fortune of some excellent volunteers this year. 

Facilities: Planning for the future in yesterday's facilities 
remains a constant challenge for trustees and staff. With 
no building plan in the immediate future, we must keep 
the collection pared and continue to offer less than ade- 
quate service within these constraints. 



45 






Goals: 1990 will see us finally realizing a long-term goal 
of our automation system — patron access terminals in all 
library buildings to provide more direct service to our 
library users. Collection improvements will again be im- 
portant, but fiscal limits may slow our progress here. All 
goals seem more realistic as we look at the enthusiastic sup- 
port of our Friends of the Library, Trustees, Staff, 
volunteers, and many patrons. 



Statistical Reports 

Monies deposited with Town Treasurer 

from fines, fees & lost materials 
Circulation: 304,666 
Staff: (full-time) 13 

(part-time) 11 (FTE's) 

(pages) 1.6 (FTE's) 



$20,167.06 



Departments: 

Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Community Services: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Maintenance/custodial: John Reslow 
Reference: Judy Hildebrandt 
Technical Services: Gloria Jacobs 
Assistant Director: Sandra Yensen 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sandra Yensen 
Acting Director 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. Burtt, Jr. 



Judith A. Olsson 
Chairman 



John F Ketcham 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Ex Officio 

Voting strength as of December, 1989 

ENROLLED VOTERS 



PRECINCT 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

TOTALS 



DEMOCRATIC 

612 
651 
536 
724 
663 
622 
628 
637 
568 
5,641 



REPUBLICAN 


UNENROLLED 


354 


979 


366 


1,116 


298 


1,051 


344 


868 


383 


1,215 


412 


984 


434 


1,181 


343 


975 


411 


1,081 



3,345 



9,450 



TOTAL 
REGISTERED 

1,945 
2,133 
1,885 
1,936 
2,261 
2,018 
2,243 
1,955 
2,060 

18,436 



46 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Front Row: (left to right) Kimberly Marsella, Student Representative; William Mullin, Superintendent; 

Barbara Ward, Chairman 
Second Row: (left to right) Samuel Poulten, Vice Chairman; Wendy Marcks, Secretary; Carol Merriam; 

Carl Olsson 



47 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the fiscal con- 
straints resulting from Proposition 2V6 on the local level 
and the State's financial indecision continue to affect our 
schools and will undoubtedly continue into the foreseeable 
future. 

The secondary level enrollment indicates a leveling off. 
The elementary enrollment is beginning to show an in- 
crease. The School Committee is keeping a close watch on 
the changing demographics and population shifts within 
Chelmsford. 

The budget changes and fluxuations that occurred after 
the town meeting caused considerable upheaval before 
school opened in September 1989. The notice of a substan- 
tial additional cut in revenue came late in August. Ad- 
justments of very severe nature were made just before the 
opening day of school. The effects of these adjustments are 
still very evident. 

The School Committee faced the task of replacing the 
Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent in July 1990. 
The Budget Director also gave notice that he too would 
be leaving in February 1990. 

None of the School Committee's responsibilities is more 
important than maintaining quality of education even with 
a shrinking dollar. With this concept in mind the Com- 
mittee commissioned the Superintendent to reorganize the 
administrative structure of the Central Office. The new 
reorganization will answer the many needs facing the 
Chelmsford Public Schools. 

The following reports written by school personnel will 
provide you with a sampling of the accomplishments of our 
young people as well as better understanding of the learn- 
ing environment and practical experiences in our schools 
today. 



Our extra-curricular program offerings were expanded to 
include the Outreach Program which incorporated our en- 
tire student population in the extra-curricular life of our 
school; the Thomas Jefferson Forum which formed a part- 
nership between our students and the senior citizens; and 
the Student Activist Group for the Environment. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George J. Betses 
Principal 



CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

The Social Studies curriculum at Chelmsford High 
School includes Political Science in grade 9, World History 
or Ancient History in grade 10, United States History or 
American Studies in grade 1 1 , and numerous electives for 
grade 12 or when the students' schedules allow. The pro- 
gram is designed to develop well informed citizens capable 
of successfully participating in a complex, diverse world. 

The well qualified, experienced teaching staff also en- 
courages students to participate in programs that extend 
beyond the regular school day. These include Harvard and 
Bentley Model United Nations, History Day, Century III 
Leadership Contest, Student Government Day, and the 
Framingham State Essay Contest. 

W. Allen Thomas, Jr. 
Social Studies 
Department Head 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT HEAD 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Our students have exemplified excellence and have liv- 
ed up to our school district's motto "Quest for Quality." 

The Class of 1989 had over 89 percent pursue higher 
education. The dropout rate for the entire school last year 
was 2.1 percent, compared to the national average of 40 
percent. The Scholastic Aptitude Test results of the 
Chelmsford High School students were 25 to 75 percent 
higher than the state and national averages on both the 
verbal and the math portions of the test. There are eight 
(8) National Merit Semi-Finalists and twenty-two (22) win- 
ners of Letters of Commendation in the Class of 1990. 

In addition to our academic accomplishments, 
Chelmsford High School has set an unprecedented record 
of winning the Division I Ernest Dalton Trophy for the 
seventh consecutive year. 



The High School English Department is pleased with the 
results of its continued efforts on behalf of the Chelmsford 
students during the academic year 1988-89. Through the 
expertise of our professional staff, our students are perfor- 
ming exceptionally well in the area of language arts. 

Our ninth grade students once again placed first in the 
state and twelfth nationally in the Language Arts Olym- 
piad, a contest involving over 190 private and public 
freshmen throughout the United States. Freshman Raj 
Prasad and sophomore Keith Patton won cash prizes in the 
UMass Excellence in Expository Writing Program. Then 
junior Lisa Blackman was among 700 winners represen- 
ting all 50 states to receive recognition, along with the 
Chelmsford High English Department, by the National 
Council of Teachers of English, for superior performance 
in writing. Twenty-three of our twenty-five senior English 
Advanced Placement students qualified for college credit 
on the national standardized test. In addition, then senior 
Ben King was selected for The Bard College Prize for 
Critical Writing. 



48 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

In an effort to stay abreast with the ever changing 
sciences, several of our staff have taken courses or par- 
ticipated in workshops. Mr. Frank Turner completed a 
course in quantitative analysis at the University of Lowell. 
Mr. Ralph Sherwood completed an in-service chemistry 
workshop sponsored by the Boston Museum of Science. Mr. 
Michael Winn, Mr. Michael Tate, Mr. Donald Parkhurst, 
and Mr. Andrew Sorenson participated in a week long 
summer workshop at the University of Lowell on the use 
of two-way television in the science classroom. 

There were also two workshops held at the high school 
during the summer, one on the interfacing of science 
equipment with the computer and the other to write a cur- 
riculum for the popular science course. The computer 
workshop was attended by Mr. Tate, Mr. Parkhurst, Mr. 
Sherwood, Mr. Sorenson and Mr. John Mosto. The other 
workshop was attended by Mr. Tate, Mr. Sorenson and 
Mr. Parkhurst. 

Three curriculum workshops were held during the 
month of December. They were attended by the teachers 
of biology, chemistry, and physics. The tools that we use 
to teach science have become high-tech, and we are doing 
our best to become proficient in the utilization of these 
tools. 

Submitted by, 
Mike Tate 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 7-12 

Students at the McCarthy Middle School enjoy the 
designing and construction of a race car and the design 
and construction of a dream house. Home design and 
repair has been added to the curriculum in the 8th grade 
course. Although every student has technology education 
classes for only one quarter of the school year, they seem 
to benefit from the class and receive a great deal of in- 
sight into the world of technology that is just ahead for 
them. 

Grades 9-12 saw a reduction in the number of course 
opportunities for the students to choose from and the class 
size was increased significantly. 

Electronics classes are showing an increse in student 
enrollment especially at the freshman level. The Robot, 
Hero, is our bet salesman. In technical drawing and ar- 
chitectural drawing, the purchase of a C.A.D. system 
through grant money; is being phased into the curriculum. 
It has the capability of doing house designs, three dimen- 
sional drawings, bills of materials and much more. It will 
eventually be utilized in the house construction class as well 
as the fine furniture class to aid students in the design and 
drawings necessary for their projects. 



Classes in small engine repair have been enjoyed by many 
students who are able to work on their own lawn mowers 
and snow blowers to repair and maintain them. 

It is my hope that parents will research these courses and 
encourage their daughters and sons to sign up and take 
a few of these courses while at C.H.S. 

Submitted by, 
Barry T. Bell 
Department Head for 
Technology Education 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department 
continues to adapt its curriculum to meet the needs of each 
individual student. The Pre -Algebra course, initiated last 
year as a replacement for the two year Algebra One se- 
quence for low achievers, appears to be a success. This 
course provides a transition year for students whose skills 
are weak. Successful completion of this course qualifies a 
student to elect college Algebra One for the following 
school year. Due to decline in enrollment and budgetary 
constraints, level three Calculus was not offered last year 
and it appears that it will be dropped from the Program 
of Studies. Further reductions in staff will cause more 
courses to be eliminated. This will definitely have an 
adverse affect on the quality of education that our children 
will receive in the future. 

The Town of Chelmsford remains fortunate to employ 
a well -qualified, highly-motivated, dedicated and diver- 
sified Mathematics teaching staff. However, we will greatly 
miss Paul Toomy and Richard Graham who retired last 
year after twenty years of dedicated service to the Town. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education Department, through its par- 
ticipation in CTAPE (City and Town Administrators of 
Physical Education in Massachusetts) planned several 
workshops that encompassed various grade levels and cur- 
ricular areas. "Personal Fitness," conducted by Manny 
Harageones from the Florida State Department of Educa- 
tion, presented an outline of a personal fitness concepts 
course for high school students. A follow up workshop on 
"Personal Fitness" is planned at the high school level to 
explore the possibility of inclusion of a personal fitness elec- 
tive in the curriculum. "Improving Teacher Effectivness: 
Everyone's Responsibility," conducted by Johanne Smith 
of Bridgewater State College, focused on lesson content, 
time analysis, instructional feedback, and student prac- 
tice. A statewide "Elementary Physical Education Grading 
Procedures Survey and Workshop" resulted in a useful 
packet of information for analyzing and updating grading 
policies. A workshop of general interest with Dr. William 
Castelli of the Framingham Heart Study is in place for 
March. The topic will be the role of physical activity in 
the cholesteral game. 



49 



FROM THE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR ART 

All schools are now feeling the effects of the school 
budget constraints in the form of increased class sizes, 
greater teacher work load, lack of funds for curriculum 
and staff development and decreased availability of sup- 
plies. However, due to the dedication of our art teaching 
staff, we are still able to provide a quality visual art 
program. 

In 1989, computer graphics were introduced to students 
and staff in all schools, both within the art curriculum as 
well as in an inter-disciplinary approach. The focus of com- 
puter graphics applications has been on informational 
design and presentation. Both hardware and software were 
purchased through grant funding and capital improvement 
expenditures, and therefore did not impact the school 
budget. The introduction, training and utilization of this 
equipment, however, has been severely restricted due to 
a lack of funds for teacher training and for personnel to 
instruct students and supervise the computer labs. 

Students in the high school art portfolio program have 
continued to excel. 1989 saw a record number of Boston 
Globe Scholastic Art Award winners, as well as a record 
number of students continue their art education at the col- 
lege level. Well over $200,000 in merit scholarships in art 
were awarded to this year's graduates. C.H.S. students 
received three of the five 4-year, full tuition Chancellor's 
Award for Art scholarships to the University of 
Massachusetts. 

A student art exchange program was initiated with the Af- 
filiated Middle School of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine 
Arts, People's Republic of China, and Arts Lottery Grants 
were awarded for the following projects: 

• student fieldtrips to the Museum of Fine Art, 
Boston (Parker & South Row Schools) 

• American Art History slide lectures for art and 
social study students (C.H.S.) 

• murals program (C.H.S.) 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

The Music Department strives to assist students in 
discovering and developing their musical talents for bet- 
ter understanding and enjoyment of a wide variety of 
musical styles. 

The Westlands School has two part-time music 
specialists, with all other elementary schools having one 
music specialist each, who is responsible for all music 



education in the building, except for instruction on band 
and orchestral instruments. Each elementary school has 
weekly lessons in music with a multi- level performing choral 
group of approximately 115 students. These schools have 
recorder concerts, and the use of ORFF instruments in both 
classroom instruction and public performances. Some 
schools also have guitar clubs. 

General music at the McCarthy is given to all sixth, 
seventh and eighth grade students. General music in these 
grades is basically designed for non- performing students: 
for many it is their last formal contact with music educa- 
tion. All McCarthy students have the opportunity to join 
one of the performing choral groups which number ap- 
proximately 200 students. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an experience 
not found in other areas within the music department. In- 
struction in playing orchestral string instruments is offered 
starting in grade three, and in all band and orchestral in- 
struments from grades four through twelve. Each par- 
ticipating student is offered one small group lesson each 
week. In addition, there is the opportunity to participate 
in small group and larger ensembles during and after 
school. The "elementary select orchestra" is made up of the 
more advanced orchestra students from four of our elemen- 
tary schools. They rehearse after school on Thursdays. 
There are approximately 800 students participating in our 
instrumental music program, grade three through twelve 
while the choral program totals approximately 900 
students. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles perform in school 
and community concerts and other programs throughout 
the school year. McCarthy and High School students have 
the opportuity to audition for the M.M.E.A Northeastern 
Jr. and Senior District concerts as well as the all -state con- 
cert. Several of our secondary school music groups will per- 
form for the A.C.D.A. and M.I.C.A. competitions. This 
year our high school symphony orchestra is planning a 
Great Britain concert tour in May. Some of our communi- 
ty concerts include: McCarthy Elderly Luncheon, "Down- 
Town Crossing" Boston and tours of local nursing homes. 
Our high school music department will present its annual 
Broadway Musical this May. The music department will 
hold its annual band and choral festivals this March while 
the orchestra festival is scheduled for May. 

The Chelmsford Friends of Music, a parental support 
group, has continued to show their support to the total 
music department. They are responsible for the after school 
private lesson program and their scholarship program in- 
cludes: Private lesson grants, summer music camp and col- 
lege scholarships. This year they are also underwriting the 
cost of our music festival concerts. 

Our plans for the future are to continue to update and 
coordinate the music curriculum with increased sensitivi- 
ty of modern technology in the field while also keeping with 
traditional music teaching. 



50 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

The 1988-89 school year was one full of activities in the 
Foreign Language Department, both at CHS and 
McCarthy. 

At McCarthy, Mrs. Deschene again accompanied a 
group of French students on a four-day trip to Quebec, 
and Mr. Tymowicz's students prepared a variety of in- 
teresting dishes for his annual two-day international food 
festival. It is an event anticipated and enjoyed by students 
and staff. 

Students at CHS involved in the Foreign Language Club 
held an international costume party at Halloween, par- 
ticipated in a variety of activities to mark National Foreign 
Language Week in March, and traveled to Montreal for 
a two-day excursion during April vacation. The French 
and Spanish Honor Societies included a total of 48 new 
members. Monies raised through fund-raising activities by 
the French Honor Society provided two graduating seniors 
with scholarships. Forty French students also participated 
in the National French Exam in March. Once again, the 
French and Spanish Exchanges completed another suc- 
cessful year hosting foreign students and traveling abroad. 

In the area of curriculum, initial work was begun to 
revamp the sequencing of courses in French and Spanish. 
A committe^'of teachers met several times in the late spring 
to discuss consolidating courses at CHS and incorporating 
some proficiency-based objectives into the language cur- 
riculum. During 1989-90, further work will be done in this 
area, and implementation of changes will begin in 
September 1990. The changes will include eliminating 
beginning 8th grade Spanish and French and moving the 
FLEX Course from 7th to 8th grade. 



The Early Childhood Education program, using the 
Commuity Education sponsored preschool as a laboratory 
for the high schoolers, continues to be successful. Some 
of our students continued their education in this field, as 
more caregiving services are needed. Education for 
childcare and parenting will become more important in 
the next decade. 

A mini grant from the Chelmsford Education Founda- 
tion funded a nutrition computer program which will be 
utilized in High School classes. As personal computers 
become standard equipment in many homes, our students 
are offered hands on opportunities in diet analysis, recipe 
evaluation, job applications and pre-school software. 

The Home Economics staff attends workshops and con- 
ferences offered by the Massachusetts Home Economics 
Association in a concerted effort to keep up with new in- 
formation in our field. 



from the principal of 
the McCarthy middle school 

The 1988-1989 school year saw the advent of a Special 
Projects teacher whose responsibility it was to staff the com- 
puter laboratory facility. The addition of this staff person 
allowed complete utilization of the computers. It became 
possible for students to work on independent as well as class 
projects. The increased usage of the laboratory has shown 
the need for an additional facility with state of the art 
machines. 



FROM THE HOME ECONOMICS 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 



The guidance staff saw the addition of the position of 
crisis counselor. This staff person provides outreach to 
families of our students and acts as a liaison to local social 
service agencies. With the advent of this new dimension 
to the counseling staff, we are better able to provide for 
the social and emotional needs of our students. 



The goal of the Home Economics Department is to pro- 
vide students in grades 7 through 12 with practical life 
skills. Because both parents are often working, there is a 
need for young people to accept responsibility at an early 
age. 

The mandatory 10 week program in the seventh and 
eighth grades introduces both sexes to the basic skills in 
cooking, sewing, consumerism and decision making. 
Because of the success of this curriculum, many students 
opted for the Home Economics I full year comprehensive 
course, thus earning 10 practical arts credits. 

One Home Economics teacher retired this past year, and 
since this position was not filled. We lost all of our popular 
foods classes. In our nutrition conscious society, this has 
been a great loss for our students. 



The Odyssey of the Mind program became a major 
event, not only for the McCarthy Middle school but also 
for the town of Chelmsford. The McCarthy Middle school 
hosted the regional competition for northern Massachu- 
setts. Students from the seacoast to the western border of 
the state spent a Saturday in competition for the regional 
awards as well as the honor of representing their school 
in the state finals. The event was an overwhelming success 
and would not have been possible except for the efforts 
of the staff and parents, and the support of the central 
administration and the school committee. 

The staff and administration of the McCarthy Middle 
school continues to look forward to the challenges of 
meeting the educational, physical, social, and emotional 
needs of the students of Chelmsford in this period of in- 
creasing fiscal constraints. 



51 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES, GRADES 6-8 

The McCarthy Social Studies Department sponsored the 
National Geography Bee for grades 6-8. It will run a News 
Quiz 1990, has encouraged students to enter various con- 
tests, such as, The Great Explorers Contest and has done 
an excellent job with bulletin boards celebrating certain 
holidays, i.e. Veterans Day. A model United Nations pro- 
gram was initiated in grade seven and a travel fair, featur- 
ing the study of Europe, was held in grade six. Project 300 
was an enormous success. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE, GRADES 6-8 

The major goal of the science curricula, grades six 
through eight, is to develop in the students the skills of 
scientific investigation which involves not only measure- 
ment and laboratory techniques but also problem-solving 
situations. To accomplish this goal, the science teachers 
employ a variety of techniques which involve notetaking 
along with the keeping of a notebook, audio-visuals, oral 
exercises, laboratory activities and homework. These 
techniques are used to develop organizational, listening, 
critical thinking and research skills. The sixth grade con- 
tent involves units in the life, earth and physical sciences 
as well as health and environmental education, while the 
seventh grade curriculum stresses the life sciences and the 
eighth grade program involves geology, astronomy, 
meteorology and oceanography. 

During the 1989-90 school year, the science staff in ad- 
dition to their regular classwork has been active with 1) 
curricular activities for the spring NASA Seeds Projects ex- 
periments and the planned outdoor education trips for 
sixth graders in May, 2) courses and workshops in the areas 
of computers and recycling, and 3) textbook appraisals for 
updated text selections. Also, the science department has 
been continuously updating safety standards in the science 
classroom. 



published. In addition, several McCarthy students have 
placed quite well in various essay contests. Process writing 
procedures are used with most assignments, and students 
are encouraged to use these procedures when writing in 
other content areas. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MATHEMATICS, GRADES 6-8 

The mathematics department at McCarthy Middle 
School has studied the new standards recommended by the 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and has im- 
plemented a program that emphasizes problem solving 
strategies and the use of calculators with all students. A 
National Science Foundation Grant has supported the pur- 
chase of teaching materials and calculators for our 
mathematics classses and will continue to support both 
materials and teacher training during 1990. 



FROM THE DIRECTORS OF 
HUMANITIES AND SCIENCE 

Accomplishments in 1989 were many. The kindergarten 
program including an exit criteria was made available for 
staff and parents. The whole language movement con- 
tinues to grow throughout our system. The Zaner Bloser 
handwriting system was introduced in September. Several 
pilot studies are underway in various facets of the 
curriculum. 

A goal for 1990 is to review and integrate the reading 
and language arts scope and sequence of skills. 

It has been a busy and difficult year, with the budget 
constraints, however, we look forward to 1990 with hope 
for continued progress toward our Quest for Quality. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH, GRADES 6-8 

During the past year the language arts staff has done 
much to encourage writing at McCarthy Middle School. 
Many classes have become more involved in the computer 
lab where youngsters have been learning word processing 
skills. Students have created crossword puzzles, children's 
stories, poetry, multiple examples of original prose, and il- 
lustrations for various original works. With the major 
assistance of the computer instructor, an original story was 
even animated! To encourage writing further, papers are 
regularly displayed in classrooms, submitted to the school 
literary magazine, and submitted to professional publica- 
tions in which several of our students' works have been 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER I 

Chapter I is the bedrock on which federal aid to elemen- 
tary schools has been built. Chapter I grants are given to 
school sytems who qualify, and are focused on low- 
achieving, disadvantaged students. Chapter I programs 
have been very successful nationwide and also in 
Chelmsford. 

New Computers have been added to the Chapter I pro- 
gram as well as some new materials. Chapter I teachers 
work in small groups and strive to supplement and enhance 
classroom instruction. A very dedicated staff, well plann- 
ed curriculum and cooperation with the classroom teacher 
and parents make the Chapter I project in Chelmsford a 
very successful venture. 



52 



FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

The staff, student aides and parent volunteers in the 
libraries, Instructional Media Center, and Cable 43 have 
all helped to make the school-year goals productive. 

The following are highlights of successful events and ac- 
tivities. The circulation rate continues to climb with a com- 
bined total of 138,010 for all school libraries. On the 
elementary level, reading programs such as "A Poem in 
Your Pocket," the "Community Read-In" which brought 
72 adult readers into 80 classrooms, and "Parent As 
Reading Partners" were well received. The McCarthy 
Library expanded into the telecommunications arena with 
the installation of a modem for the KITES Program (Kids 
Interactive Telecommunications Experienced by Satellite) 
established by the University of Lowell. A teleconference 
via satellite with students in W. Germany was the 
culminating activity held at Digital. At the Chelmsford 
High School Library, online data base searching involved 
demonstrations for 450 students, 100 individual searches, 
and an introductory workshop for faculty. School Improve- 
ment funds made possible the purchase of paperback 
books, a Mac View frame for computer demonstrations and 
a 16 mm film projector. A CD-ROM player and the 
Academic Encyclopedia disk were purchased to expand 
students' research skills. 

In the Instructional Media Center, the collection was 
weeded and an AV Booklet of all its holdings with grade 
levels was published and distributed. The entire Massa- 
chusetts Educational Television (MET) programming was 
videotaped off-air and catalogued for circulation. Over 
3000 audio-visual items circulated throughout the school 
system, and steps have been taken to automate the AV col- 
lection. A grant was received from the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council to produce "Art: A Bridge To Understanding," 
and a videodisc demonstration was held. 

Highlights of Cable 43 include: winning six awards for 
four programs produced by students, a public access pro- 
ducer and the staff which received local, regional and/or 
national recognition: facilitating the following two-way in- 
teractive distance learning projects (KITES, McCarthy; 
BI-TECH, South Row; STARS, Chelmsford High); spon- 
soring a successful "Cable 43 Open House" in conjunction 
with the National Federation of Local Programmers; in- 
viting administrators and department heads to participate 
in the first of a series of teleconferencing programs designed 
specifically for educators; sponsoring two fund raising ac- 
tivities, a golf tournament and theatre party. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal Govern- 
ment's Public Law 94-142, the Education of Handicap- 
ped Children Act, were enacted to assure that all handicap- 
ped children have a free and appropriate education to be 
provided by the local community. 



The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is 
responsible for providing effective programs and services 
for children, ages three through twenty-one, who are found 
to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each handicap- 
ped student receives an education designed to meet his or 
her unique learning needs and to receive the services in 
the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1989 the Special Education Depart- 
ment had 847 students registered to receive special educa- 
tion services, which represents 16.6 percent of Chelmsford's 
total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-one special education personnel 
develop and implement the individualized educational 
plans for these students. For those students with severe lear- 
ning and/ or emotional needs, Chelmsford provides for 
placement in private day or residential schools as approv- 
ed by the State Department of Education. 

For the 1989-1990 school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of $3,230,458, of 
which $255,799. is provided through grants by the federal 
government. 

The Special Education Department will continue its 
quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs and 
services for the children we serve. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

The 1988-1989 school year has seen continued growth 
in our Community Education Programs. Adult Education 
Evening programs continue to service approximately 3000 
students per year and offer over 100 courses per semester 
from Northeastern University, Middlesex Community Col- 
lege, Lesley College as well as our own community interest 
classes. Summer School classes held at Chelmsford High 
School met the needs of our own students as well as young 
people from over twenty surrounding schools. Plans are 
now being made to offer college credit classes through Mid- 
dlesex Community College for the Summer of 1990. 

Our various Childcare programs continue to include 
morning and afternoon Extended day programs, regular 
and integrated preschool programs, vacation programs and 
full day Kindergarten/Childcare. New for 1988-1989 was 
a seven week Summer Camp run at the Parker School. Our 
Out-of-Town Tuition student program continues to attract 
students from surrounding communities and this past year 
returned $60,000.00 to the regular school budget. 

Community Education is pleased to offer these various 
services to the Chelmsford community on a self suppor- 
ting, user fee basis. Brochures listing courses and programs 
are mailed to all homes during August, December and 
March. 



53 



GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1989, there were 490 graduates. Of those graduates, 
437 went on to post-secondary education which represents 
89%. 



4 year colleges 
2 year colleges 
technical schools 



364 (74%) 

65 (13%) 

8 (2% ) 



437 89% 



In terms of non-educational placements, 45 students 
(9%) elected employment and 3 students joined the 
military. 



Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1989, 93 students took 135 Advanced Place- 
ment examinations at Chelmsford High School with 85.2% 
of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The program grades 
on a five-point college-level scale: 

5— extremely well qualified 

4— well qualified 

3 — qualified 

2 — possibly qualified 

1 — no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable to col- 
lege grades of A and grades of 3 and 2 most comparable 
to college grades of B and C, respectively. Many colleges 
will award a third to a full year of placement and credit 
to successful AP candidates. 



Drop Out Rate: 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School continues 
to be low. During the 1988-89 academic year, CHS had a 
total student enrollment of 1712. The number of drop outs 
was 36, which represents a drop out rate of 2.1%. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1988-89 








Req. to 


Voluntary 






Employment Leave 


Withdrawal 


Total 


Boys 


5 2 


16 


23 


Girls 


2 


11 


13 


Total 


7 2 


27 


36 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the Class of 
1989 continue to be higher than the average Massachusetts 
and National scores. 



In the verbal area, Chelmsford scored 453 which is 21 
points higher than the State average (432) and 26 points 
higher than the National average (427). 

In the math area, Chelmsford scored 499 which is 26 
points higher than the State average (473) and 23 points 
higher than the National average (476). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Programs 

In the 1988-89 academic year, 172 students enrolled in 
ten Service Study and Career Exploration programs. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective design- 
ed to combine practical experience with the students' 
academic studies as they use their free time to pursue an 
area similar to their chosen field. In addition to assisting 
our athletic trainer, several programs are designed for 
students who are interested in working with special needs 
children. This year the Outreach Program for high school 
special needs students was added to their choices. 

The Career Exploration Program gives an opportunity 
to all students to supplement their schedule and gain in- 
sight and experience as they volunteer to work as an assis- 
tant in our offices, library, science lab, television studio, 
or our Graphic Arts Department. 

Scheduling for these programs is flexible, and the elec- 
tives may be taken for one semester or the entire year. All 
students are placed in their preferred area and credits are 
distributed according to the number of periods they work, 
their performance and attendance. 

Career Center 

The Chelmsford High School Career Center continues 
to be a model for student awareness of college, vocational 
and career information. Students and parents use this 
facility for college search, occupations, descriptions and 
various career options, employment and also a study area. 

The following events took place in the Career Center 
from September 1988 to June 1989: 

141 college representatives 

25 Chelmsford High School Alumni participated 
in our Reverse College Day 

20 Speakers on various careers 

45 Students enrolled for the A.S.V.A.B. Test. 
Test was given on June 2, 1989. 
Various military personnel visited the Center during 
the school year. 

Counselors and teachers brought classes and home- 
rooms to introduce students to the facility. 

The Career Center is stocked with up-to-date college 
catalogues, financial aid information and college applica- 
tions. Additionally, computers and V.C.R.s are available 
to search for colleges. 

The Career Center is open to students, parents and the 
Chelmsford community at large. 



54 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since 1981, when the School Department started its own 
in-house computerization effort, all major school business 
related applications have been automated on our computer 
systems. These systems include a DEC 11/44, VAX 750, 
and various microcomputers. In-house staff now maintain 
all data bases on students, accounting, personnel, census, 
scheduling, attendance, report cards and a plethora of 
other applications. 

Other town departments serviced in some way by the 
school computer include: Council on Aging, Town Can- 
didates for Office, Town Library, Selectmen's School War- 
rant Report, Community Education, PTA, Booster Club, 
Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational School, Police 
Department, Commission on Handicapped, Sewer Com- 
mission and Planning Board. 

Future involvements will revolve around networking 
computers, data communications and telecommunications. 
Technical obstacles to these formidable endeavors are be- 
ing evaluated and have the potential to significantly in- 
crease the productivity of the schools. 



FROM THE PROGRAM 
SUPERVISOR FOR ATHLETICS 

The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department dur- 
ing the 1988-89 school year fielded 26 varsity teams, 13 
junior varsity teams, 1 sophomore team, and 7 freshman 
teams. An overall record from 338 varsity contests was 
228-98-12 with a total of 1,020 athletes competing. The 
department earned an unprecedented 7th consecutive 
Dalton Trophy as the most winning program in all of Divi- 
sion I. 



Chelmsford taking into consideration the severe limitations 
of our present resources. It is the position of the Chelmsford 
School Committee that the Chelmsford School System 
should focus initially on in-service for its entire professional 
staff. The School Committee feels that if a comprehensive 
program can be developed that will assist in updating 
teaching skills, that the Chelmsford School System will be 
well on its way towards achieving the common goal of our 
educational programs to develop the knowledge current 
skills, processes and attitudes which our students will need 
to be productive, responsible, and self- fulfilled members 
of our school and society. 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the parents, 
teacher organizations, to the many advisory committees, 
to the School Improvement Councils, school volunteer 
workers, and to the citizens for their cooperation and 
assistance this past year. 

The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation to the following staff member for their years of 
loyal and meritorious service and who have retired this past 
year: 

Ella Sue LaCerva — Guidance — Chelmsford High School 
Richard Graham — Teacher — Chelmsford High School 
Paul Toomey — Teacher — Chelmsford High School 
Edgar Theriault — Custodian — McCarthy Middle School 
Mary Jane MacDonald — Teacher — Chelmsford High School 
Laurette Brady— ESP — McCarthy Middle School 
Ann Rooney — Secretary — Media Center 
Ruth Dooley— Teacher — South Row Shool 
Arnold Porter — Teacher — Westlands School 
Katherine Sullivan — Teacher — Westlands School 
Doris Tereshko — Teacher— South Row School 
Leo Clermont — Custodian— Harrington School 
Bruce Mellin — Teacher — Chelmsford High School 
Rebecca Burnett — Teacher — Chelmsford High School 
Robert Noy — Principal — Westlands 



In Memoriam 



IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee conducted a town-wide goals 
survey. Based on the results of the educational goals survey, 
the long-term objective of the Chelmsford School System 
is to return educational excellence as a priority in 



The community and the school department were grieved 
by the death of Raymond St.Onge, Director of Guidance. 
He was loved and respected by everyone. He will be long 
remembered for his dedicated service to the school system 
and his devotion to the children of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 



55 






CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 




Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman; John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman; Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 






56 



THE SEWER COMMISSION 

1989 marked the first time in history that public sewerage 
was available to residents of the Town of Chelmsford. In 
June, North Chelmsford residents were permitted to hook- 
up to the sewer system when the Southwell Field Pump Sta- 
tion went on line. In November, flow commenced in the 
Chelmsford Center Area including the Chelmsford Center 
Industrial Sewer District when the Katrina Road Pump Sta- 
tion commenced acceptance of flow. 

Construction was intense in Chelmsford Center, par- 
ticularly in the Route 110 business district in 1989. The 
public endured traffic delays and detours along Routes 4, 
27, 129 and 110. By the end of the year, 95% of the main 
line sewer had been installed in the Center Area. The 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission is extremely grateful to the 
Chelmsford Police Department for the fine work of the 
uniformed traffic officers directing detours and the 
residents of Chelmsford for their patience and under- 
standing during the unavoidable delays. Final paving in 
the Center Area is scheduled for the spring of 1990. 

Construction began in two additional neighborhood 
areas of Town in 1989. These areas were the Kensington 
Drive Area and the Golden Cove Road Area. Bids were 
opened and construction commenced in these areas as 
described below: 



Due to the start-up of the North Chelmsford and 
Chelmsford Center Sewer systems, the Commission ex- 
panded the Chelmsford Sewer Department staff by hiring 
James Casparro as Sewer Superintendent and Joseph Witts 
as Maintenance Mechanic. Their responsibilities include 
operation and maintenance of the new multimillion dollar 
wastewater collection system as well as supervision and in- 
spection of all private sewer connections. 

During Calendar Year 1989, the Chelmsford Sewer 
Department approved the following connections: 



North Chelmsford 
Chelmsford Center 
Industrial District 

TOTAL 



Residential Commercial 

312 6 

4 6 

6 3 

322 15 



Residents are reminded that the Town By-Laws require 
connection within one year of the date the sewer system 
in front of their property is approved for use. In 1990, it 
is anticipated that the Department will be extremely busy 
coping with many additional connections as the remain- 
ing tie-ins in the North and most of the connections in the 
Center will be made. 

The following revenues were collected by the Sewer Com- 
mission in 1989 and are summarized as follows: 



Project Name 



Contractor 



Start/Finish % Complete 

Date Bid Amount 12/31/89 



Kensington Drive 
Area Lateral Sewers 
(Contract 88-2) 

Golden Cove Rd. 
Area Lateral Sewers 
(Contract 88-3) 



DiGregorio Const. Co. 



Albanese Bros,, Inc. 



6/89-1/91 $2,590,606 



11/89-11/90 1868,051 



51% 



17% 



TOTAL 



$3,458,657 



The 1989 bid prices were 26% lower than the original 
estimates. These prices proved to be even more competitive 
than the 1988 bid prices. The trend for competitive prices 
has been apparent since 1986 and was even more evident 
as activity in the construction industry slowed in 1989. 

At the April 1989 Annual Town Meeting the voters 
unanimously approved the continuation of the Town's 
overall sewer program, appropriating $39,000,000 for con- 
struction in identified residential needs areas. The con- 
struction has been scheduled with a phased approach. The 
first targeted areas are the South Chelmsford neighbor- 
hoods of Old Stage, Domenic Drive and Farms II. Design 
in these areas began in 1989 and construction is expected 
to commence in mid 1990. Of the estimated $9.1 million 
cost for this portion of the project, approximately $4 
million in State Grants is anticipated. 



Source 


Amount 


Betterments —Town 


$320,000 


Betterments— Industrial District 


350,481 


Connection Permit Fees 


35,750 


Installer License Fees 


6,579 


TOTAL 


$712,810 



Work on the Town Wide Drainage Facilities Plan con- 
tinued in 1989 and completion is expected in mid 1990. 
The plan will identify and analyze specific drainage pro- 
blems throughout the Town. A recommended plan for, and 
costs of remediation of identified problem areas will also 
be outlined. 

The Commission expects 1990 to be just as successful as 
1989 as more and more properties connect to the sewer 
system resulting in the environmental and public health 
protection that the system was designed to provide. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 



57 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Board of Selectmen awarded a 3 year contract to 
Browning-Ferris Industries for regular trash collection, and 
a 3 year contract for curbside recycling collection to En- 
vironmental Ideas/a Vining Company. The recycling pro- 
gram began on July 3. Residents put their recyclables at 
the curb with their regular trash every 2 weeks. Materials 
collected are newspapers, glass bottles and jars, tin cans, 
aluminum cans, plastic milk, water, juice and detergent 
bottles, and returnable bottles and cans. In the first 6 
months of the new contracts, 1148 tons of recyclables were 
collected and 7037 tons of trash were collected. 

On November 4 and December 2 , Environmental Ideas 
collected leaves placed at the curb in paper leaf bags. On 
November 18, Environmental Ideas donated the use of a 
dumpster for a drop-off at the Highway Yard. A total of 
350 tons of leaves were delivered to Charlie Laugh ton's farm 
in Westford for composting. About 900 Christmas trees 
were delivered to the highway yard on January 6, which 
were chipped by the Department of Public Works for use 
in their projects. 



OFFICE OF 
THE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPT. MEMBERS: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Treasurer-Tax Collector 

Carol R. Lambert, Asst. Treasurer 

Margaret M. Mullen, Dept. Asst. to Tax Collector 

Lorraine D. Parkhurst, Payroll Co-ordinator 

Bettie A. Osborne, Accts. Payable/ Receivable Clerk 

Donna M. Rogers, Data Processing Clerk 

Judith A. Olsson, Legal Document Prep. Clerk (part-time) 

Dept. Notes: 

The retirement of Florence M. Ramsay in September of 
1989 as Asst. Treasurer left a void in the staff, which is 
quickly being filled by her replacement, Carol R. Lambert. 
Florence had served the Town of Chelmsford for twenty- 
plus years and had been an instrumental part in maintain- 
ing quality records for audit purposes and State reporting 
requirements. She was a main factor in the Town's bond 
rating review process, having seen the rating raised once 
and held at the higher level despite uncertain financial 
times at the state level recently. Her years ahead spent in 
retirement are certainly well-deserved. 

On the collection side of the office operations, there has 
been a sharp increase in the number of tax accounts that 
are in arrears. This will mean more liens will be placed 
against the titles of properties in Town and more licenses 
will be suspended through the Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

The sewer project is well on its way now with flow to 
Lowell becoming a reality this year. The costs of the pro- 
ject are being borne by taxpayers and system users equal- 
ly. The costs to date have caused the average household 
to be taxed an additional $150.00 per year. Future costs 
associated with the remainder of the sewer project could 
see the average household taxed approximately $300.00 



more per year than current levels. As the project winds 
down, taxes should decline since bonds will be retired 
beginning in the year 1999, and ending approx. in the year 
2005. 

Revenues aren't keeping up with cost increases in wages 
and fixed expenditure areas. This has produced service cut- 
backs in public education and some government opera- 
tions. The trend shows future budgets will have severe 
revenue deficiencies when compared to known costs. This 
will pose a serious threat to maintaining Town services at 
a level equal to past years. Each dept. in Town will feel 
some affect from this revenue shortfall, even though many 
cuts are still in the process of being analyzed by the Town 
Manager. 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Manager 
Bernard F. Lynch 

Department of Public Works 
Director 

James Pearson 

Highway Division 

Michael Crory, Superintendent 

Engineering Division 

James Pearson, Town Engineer 

Recreation Commission 

Lorraine Murphy, Clerk 

Public Buildings Division 

Robert Deletetsky, Superintendent 

Parks Division 

Donald Gray, Superintendent 

Sewer Division 

James Casparro, Superintendent 

Finance Committee 

Three Year Term — Appointed by Moderator 

Brian R. Sullivan 

Dwight M. Hayward (Chmn.) 

Myra Silver 

Donald L. Elias 

William R. Logan 

George Simonian 

Cheryl A. Boss 

Peter V. Lawlor (resigned 9/89) 

Stephen A. Cain (resigned 6/89) 

Clerk Susan Olsen 

Fire Chief 
Robert L. Hughes 

Deputy Chief 

James Sousa 
Charles Galloway 

Police Chief 

Raymond McKeon 

Deputy Chief 

Pennryn Fitts 
James Greska 



58 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND TRUST & AGENCY FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1989 



REVENUES: 



GENERAL 



(COMBINED 

SPECIAL CAPITAL TRUST AND MEMORANDUM 

REVENUE PROJECTS AGENCY ONLY) 



Property Taxes 
Intergovernmental 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 
Investment Income 
Departmental 

Total Revenues 



$25,764,508 

10,103,594 

2,362,380 

451,727 

1,285,859 

39,968,068 



3,372,794 

15,270 
1,923,351 

5,311,415 



114,987 
843,124 



958,111 



$25,764,508 

13,476,388 

2,362,380 

581,984 

4,052,334 

46,237,594 



EXPENDITURES: 



General Government 
Public Safety 
Education 
Public Works 
Health and Sanitation 
Human Services 
Culture and Recreation 
Maturing Debt and Interest 
State and County Assessments 

Total Expenditures 



4,103,398 


862,325 


86,359 


1,027,235 


6,079,317 


5,493,758 





192,413 


772,985 


6,459,156 


21,564,843 


1,954,571 


529,701 


— 


24,049,115 


1,598,901 


110,719 


647,185 


— 


2,356,805 


1,491,806 


3,289,384 


7,535,071 


— 


12,316,261 


448,376 


13,708 


746,132 


— 


1,208,216 


815,808 


32,855 


55,154 


2,014 


905,831 


2,969,965 


— 


7,106 


— 


2,977,071 


193,320 


— 


— 


— 


193,320 



38,680,175 



6,263,562 



9,799,121 



1,802,234 



56,545,092 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
Over Expenditures 



1,287,893 



(952,147) 



(9,799,121) 



(844,123) 



(10,307,498) 



OTHER EINANCING SOURCES (USES): 



Bond Proceeds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 

Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 



247,438 
(1,131,997) 



(884,559) 



12,471 
(408,118) 



(395,647) 



11,554,094 


— 


11,554,094 


3,481 


1,345,754 


1,609,144 


- 


(69,029) 


(1,609,144) 



11,557,575 



1,276,725 



11,554,094 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources Over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 



403,334 



(1,347,794) 



1,758,454 



432,602 



1,246,596 



Fund Balance at Beginning of Year 
Fund Balance at End of Year 



2,714,966 
$3,118,300 



2,227,851 
$880,057 



3,374,848 
$5,133,302 



1,237,669 
$1,670,271 



9,555,334 
$10,801,930 



59 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET— ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUP 

JUNE 30, 1989 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 



FIDUCIARY ACCOUNT 
FUND TYPE GROUP 













GENERAL 


TOTAL 






SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST AND 


LONG-TERM 


(MEMORAN- 


ASSETS: 


GENERAL 

$2,205,596 


REVENUE 

829,236 


PROJECTS 

$6,313,166 


AGENCY 

$1,788,088 


DEBT 


DUM) ONLY) 


Cash and Temporary Investments 


— 


$11,136,086 


Property Taxes Receivable: 














Current Year 


1,369,792 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,369,792 


Prior Years 





- 


- 


- 


- 





Accounts Receivable: 














Intergovernmental: 














Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District 


122,764 


— 


— 


— 


— 


122,764 


Commonwealth of Mass. 


691,839 


329,968 


2,603,001 


- 


- 


3,624,808 


Other Accounts Receivable: 














Motor Vehicle Excise: 














Current Year 


157,067 


— 


— 


— 


— 


157,067 


Prior Years 


108,033 


— 


— 


— 


— 


108,033 


Tax Title 


315,347 


— 


— 


— 


— 


315,347 


Departmental 


4,472 


38,699 


— 


14,100 


— 


57,271 


DEF Tax CH59 CL41A 


62,863 


- 


- 


- 


- 


62,863 


Tax Foreclosures 


32,683 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32,683 


Due from (to) Other Funds 


(4,900) 


(1,891) 


- 


6,791 


- 





Amount to be Provided for 














Payment of Notes 


- 


- 


6,057,575 


- 


- 


6,057.575 


Amount to be Provided for 














Retirement of General Long-Term Debt 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17,365,000 
$17,365,000 


17,365,000 


Total Assets 


$5,065,556 


$1,196,012 


$14,973,742 


$1,808,979 


$40,409,289 



LIABILITIES: 



Accounts Payable 


$240,962 


$157,256 


$282m865 


$124,608 


— 


$805,691 


Payroll Withholdings 


150,970 


— 


— 


- 


- 


150,970 


Other Liabilities 


39,977 


— 


— 


— 


— 


39,977 


Deferred Revenue 


1,385,284 


38,699 


— 


14,100 


- 


1,438,083 


Reserve for Abatements and Exemptions 


130,063 


— 


— 


— 


— 


130,063 


Notes Payable 


— 


120,000 


9,557,575 


— 


- 


9,677,575 


Bonds Payable 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17,365,000 
17,365,000 


17,365,000 


Total Liabilities 


1,947,256 


315,955 


9,840,440 


138,708 


29,607,359 



FUND EQUITY: 

Reserved: 

Encumbrances 

Appropriation Deficit 

Over Assessments 

Endowments 
Unreserved : 

Designated 

Undesignated 

Total Fund Equity 

Total Liabilities and Fund Equity 



877,853 

(16,339) 

(12,162) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


877,853 

(16,399) 

(12,162) 




835,767 
1,433,181 


880,057 


5,133,302 


1,670,271 


- 


8,519,397 
1,433,181 


3,118,300 


880,057 


5,133,302 


1,670,271 





10,801,930 


$5,065,556 


$1,196,012 


$14,973,742 


$1,808,979 


$17,365,000 


$40,409,289 



60 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1989 



Real Estate 

1989 
1988 
1987 
1986 



Personal Property 

1989 
1988 
1987 
1986 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

1989 
1988 
1987 
1986 



Farm Animal Excise 

1989 
1988 



UNCOLLECTED 

TAXES 

JULY 1, 1988 


COMMITMENTS 


LESS 

ABATEMENTS 

AND 

ADJUSTMENTS 


LESS 

TRANSFERS 

TO 

TAX TITLE 


LESS 

NET 

COLLECTIONS 


UNCOLLECTED 

TAXES 

JUNE 30, 1989 


$0 

810,860 

86,631 

15,992 


$25,912,577 





$277,477 
2,009 
8,277 
7,065 


$0 

254,533 

53,985 

5,267 


$24,274,535 

554,318 

24,369 

3,660 


$1,360,565 





$913,483 


$25,912,577 


$294,828 


$313,785 


$24,856,882 


$1,360,565 




13,230 

5,710 

1,923 


413,375 





3,068 
3,158 
3,449 
2,208 








401,080 
10,072 
2,261 
(285) 


9,227 





20,863 


413,375 


11,883 





413,128 


9,227 


$934,346 


$26,325,952 


$306,711 


$313,785 


$25,270,010 


$1,369,792 




553,459 

82,725 

25,857 


1,573,653 

508,028 

46,869 



$2,128,550 


69,457 

60,726 

9,589 

23,341 

$163,113 


- 


1,347,130 

933,864 

78,869 

2,516 

$2,362,379 


157,066 

66,897 

41,136 




$662,041 


$0 


$265,099 



406 





$0 






$0 


- 



406 

$406 






$406 


$0 


$0 



61 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

GENERAL FUND STATEMENT OF REVENUES, TRANSFERS, AVAILABLE FUNDS, EXPENDITURES 

AND PRIOR YEARS' DEFICITS RAISED— BUDGET AND ACTUAL 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1989 



REVENUES: 

Real and Personal Property Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Intergovernmental 
Investment Income 
Departmental 

Total Revenues 

EXPENDITURES: 

General Government 

Public Safety 

Education 

Public Works 

Health and Sanitation 

Human Services 

Culture and Recreation 

Maturing Debt and Interest 

State and County Assessments 

Total Expenditures 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
Over Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 
Transfer from Fund Balance 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
Prior Year Deficits Raised 

Total Other Financing Sources 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources Over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 









VARIANCE 


ORIGINAL 


FINAL 




FAVORABLE 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


(UNFAVORABLE) 


$25,914,011 


$25,914,011 


$25,915,334 


$ 1,333 


1,711,138 


1,711,138 


2,362,380 


651,242 


10,092,096 


10,092,096 


10,103,594 


11,498 


259,879 


259,879 


451,727 


191,848 


1,200,453 


1,200,453 


1,285,859 


85,406 


39,177,577 


39,177,577 


40,118,904 


941,327 


13,263,566 








4,936,879 


5,350,949 


4,017,731 


1,333,218 


5,518,389 


5,592,889 


5,521,132 


71,757 


21,455,052 


21,455,052 


21,633,250 


(178,198) 


1,610,516 


1,610,516 


1,578,979 


31,537 


1,768,217 


1,768,217 


1,697,972 


70,245 


413,086 


421,128 


421,965 


(837) 


819,684 


820,484 


813,486 


6,998 


2,969,385 


2,969,385 


2,969,965 


(580) 


181,157 


181,157 


193,320 


(12,163) 


39,672,365 


40,169,777 


38,847,800 


1,321,977 


(494,788) 


(992,200) 


1,271,104 


2,263,304 


654,613 


1,150,444 


1,150,444 





55,000 


56,581 


231,938 


175,357 








(1,128,733) 


(1,128,733) 


(214,825) 


(214,825) 


(214,825) 





494,788 


992,200 


38,824 


(953,376) 


$ o 


$ o 


$1,309,928 


$1,309,928 



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63 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

JUNE 30, 1989 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT FUNDS: 

In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

In Custody of Selectmen 

In Custody of Veterans 

Emergency Fund Committee 



$1,521,318 

127,170 

1,064 

13,928 



IN CUSTODY OF TREASURER: 

Geo. W. Barris-Varney Playground 
Wright Reservation 
Stabilization Fund 
Insurance Sinking Fund 
Educational Collaborative 
Police Special Account 
Group Ins. Claims Chap 32B 
Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adam Emerson 

Christopher Roby ■ 

Vileata S. Douglas 

Baptist Pond Cemetery 

IN CUSTODY OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Amos F. Adams 

Geo. W. Barris 

Frances Clark 

Clement Fund 

Albert H. Davis 

Frederick B. Edwards 

Nathan B. Edwards 

Victor E. Edwards 

Adam Emerson 

Ora Flint 

George Memorial 

Thomas P. Proctor 

Serlina Richardson 

Joseph E. Warren 

Gertrude Wright 

Aaron George -Cemetery Fund 

Endowment Fund 



5,992 

26.463 

598,542 

74,914 

997 

1,457 

215,418 

10,488 

568,266 

1,387 

13,422 

2,596 

1,376 

1,521,318 



35,739 

308 

9,557 

34,639 

1,457 

4,960 

444 

2,419 

298 

1,906 

3,749 

24,174 

795 

339 

2,899 

3,437 

50 

127,170 



IN CUSTODY OF SELECTMEN: 

Emma Gay-Varney Playground 



1,064 



IN CUSTODY OF VETERANS: 
EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE: 

Veterans Emergency Fund 



$1,663,480 



13,928 
$1,663,480 



64 



FISCAL YEAR 1989— EXPENDITURES BY FUND 



DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST & 


COMBINED 


FUND 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


TOTALS 


137,805 








137,805 


300,988 




10,438 




311,426 


2,332 








2,332 


28,080 








28,080 


3,649 








3,649 


21,543 








21.543 


6,837 






15,711 


22,548 


441 








441 


14,256 








14,256 


27,962 


2,879 






30,841 


680,568 






1,004,524 


1,685,092 


1,288,092 








1,288,092 


38,751 








38,751 


36,211 








36,211 


2,736 








2,736 


1,493 








1,493 


816 








816 


134,744 








134,744 


627,510 








627,510 


3,519 








3,519 


1,121 








1,121 


300 








300 


9,067 








9,067 


792 








792 


21,739 








21,739 


143,349 




59,770 




203,119 


37,238 








37,238 


142,395 


70,671 


16,151 


7,000 


236,217 


117,256 








117,256 


6,500 








6,500 


236,761 








236,761 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Accounting 

Assessors 

Bills of Prior Years 

Board of Appeals 

Cable TV Commission 

Charter Commission 

Conservation Commission 

Constable 

Data Processing 

Elections 

Employee Benefits: 

Chapter 32B Insurance 

County Retirement Assessment 

Medicare Tax 

Unemployment Compensation 
Finance Committee 
Historic District Commission 
Historical Commission 
Law 

Liability Insurance 
Medical — Retired Police/Fire 
Mobile Home Rent Control 
Moderator 
NMAC Assessment 
Personnel Board 
Planning Board 
Public Buildings 
Registrars 
Selectmen 
Town Clerk 
Town Reports 
Treasurer 

Total General Government 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 

Dog Officer 

Emergency Management 

Fire 

Insect Pest Control 

Inspection 

Police 

Sealer Weights & Measures 

Traffic & Safety Committee 

Tree Warden 

Total Public Safety 

EDUCATION: 

Public Schools 

Nashoba Regional Tech HS 

Total Education 



PUBLIC WORKS: 

Highway 
Street Lighting 
Town Engineer 

Total Public Works 

HEALTH & SANITATION 

Animal Inspector 
Board of Health 
Lowell Mental Health 
Sewer Commission 
Waste Collection 

Total Health & Sanitation 



4,074,851 


73,550 


86,359 


1,027,235 


5,261,995 


27,020 








27,020 


3,086 








3,086 


2,635,010 




136,031 




2,771,041 


7,050 








7,050 


191,006 








191,006 


2,592,596 




43,814 


772,985 


3,409,395 


2,388 








2,388 


21,081 




12,568 




33,649 


14,521 








14,521 


5,493,758 





192,413 


772,985 


6,459,156 


20,887,353 


1,954,571 


529,701 




23,371,625 


677,490 








677,490 


21,564,843 


1,954,571 


529,701 





24,049,115 


1,369,782 


819,330 


647,185 




2,836,297 


132,308 








132,308 


96,811 








96,811 


1,598,901 


819,330 


647,185 





3,065,416 


1,400 








1,400 


155,272 


469 






155,741 


8,695 








8,695 


144,105 


3,288,915 


7,535,071 




10,968,091 


1,182,334 








1,182,334 


1,491,806 


3,289,384 


7,535,071 





12,316,261 



65 



HUMAN SERVICES: 

Cemetery 

Commission on Handicapped 

Council on Aging 

Elder Services of Mer. Valley 

Sr. Citizen Center 

Veterans Benefits 



213,653 


714 


15,070 


1,894 






105,110 


12,994 


731,062 


1,800 






28,547 






125,920 







229,437 
1,894 

849,166 

1,800 

28,547 

125,920 



Total Human Servicces 


476,924 


13,708 


746,132 





1,236,764 


CULTURE AND RECREATION: 












Cultural Council 


100 


20,805 






20,905 


Holiday Decorating Comm. 


750 








750 


Library 


696,247 


6,940 


44,411 


2,014 


749,612 


Memorial Day 


1,000 








1,000 


Park 


46,745 








46,745 


Recreation Commission 


64,711 


85,274 


10,743 




160,728 


Town Celebration 


1,518 








1,518 


Vamey Playground 


4,736 








4,736 


Total Culture & Recreation 


815,807 


113,019 


55,154 


2,014 


985,994 


MATURING DEBT & INTEREST: 












Principal Payments 


1,597,633 








1,597,633 


Interest Payments 


1,372,332 




7,106 




1,379,438 


Total Debt & Interest 


2,969,965 





7,106 





2,977,071 


STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS: 












County 


33,507 








33,507 


State 


159,813 








159,813 


Total Assessments 


193,320 











193,320 


Total Expenditures 


$38,680,175 


$6,263,562 


$9,799,121 


$1,802,234 


$56,545,092 



FISCAL YEAR 1989— REVENUE BY FUND 





GENERAL 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST & 


COMBINED 


DEPARTMENT 


FUND 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


TOTALS 


Property Tax 


25,764,508 








25,764,508 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 


2,362,380 








2,362,380 


Farm Animal Excise Tax 


406 








406 


Hotel-Motel Excise Tax 


160,021 








160,021 


Interest — Property Taxes 


126,168 








126,168 


Intergovernmental — State 


10,103,594 


2,421,743 






12,525,337 


Intergovernmental — Federal 




951,051 






951,051 


Fees 


108,917 








108,917 


Rentals 


37,050 








37,050 


Departmental 


112,694 


1,923,351 




843,123 


2,879,169 


Licenses and Permits 


465,861 








465,861 


Fines and Forfeits 


242,416 








242,416 


Investment Income 


451,727 


15,270 




114,987 


581,984 


Lowell Regional Transit 


20,467 








20,467 


Misc. 


11,859 








11,859 


Total Revenue 


39,968,068 


5,311,415 





958,111 


46,237,594 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCE: 












Bond Proceeds 








11,554,094 




11,554,094 


Operating Transfers In 


247,438 


12,471 


3,481 


1,345,754 


1,609,144 


Operating Transfers Out 


(1,131,997) 


(408,118) 




(69.029) 


(1,609,144) 


Total Other Finance Source 


(884,559) 


(395,647) 


11,557,575 


1,276,725 


11,554,094 


Total Revenue and Other 












Financing Source 


39,083,509 


4,915,768 


11,557,575 


2,234,836 


57,791,688 


Excess of Revenues Over 












Expenditures 


403,334 


(1,347,794) 


1,758,454 


432,602 


1,246,596 



66 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FIREFIGHTERS 



During Fiscal 1989, Captain Charles Galloway a 24 year 
veteran of the Fire Department was promoted to Deputy 
Chief of Operations and Firefighter Michael Burke a 13 
year veteran was promoted to Captain assigned to Fire 
Prevention under the direction of Deputy Chief James 
Sousa. Fire preventions continued expansion is a necessity 
in this day and age. Some of our top priorities are 
upgrading SARA III, inservice inspections and training. 
This was a small part of implementing a professional study 
that was requested by the officials of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

I would like to congratulate the officers and members 
of the department for continuing the high standards of ser- 
vice to the townspeople of Chelmsford under the trying 
times of the past year. 

I would also express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the cooperation during the past year that 
the Chelmsford Fire Department has received. 

Despite the fact that when times get severe this depart- 
ments services increase, our aim is to continue to protect 
the life and property of the townspeople as well as we can 
under the budget restraints that we are facing. Because 
of our fire station locations, our response time and fire loss 
was again kept at a minimum while medical calls and all 
other responses increased over last year. 

Again I would like to thank everyone involved in im- 
plementing the Chelmsford Fire Department's mission to 
the townspeople. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Hughes 
Fire Chief 



NAME 

Adley, Walter 
Anderson, Arthur 
Bennett, Robert 
Boermeester, J. 
Burke, William 
Cady, William 
Campbell, David 
Campbell, Wm. 
Carroll, John 
Cincevich, A. 
Clancy, David 
Clarke, Kevin 
Conlin, F.J. 
Conlin, Mark 
Curran, James 
Curran, Michael 
Curran, William 
Cutter, James 
Dal ton, William 
DePalma, John 
Desaulnier, Martha 
Donovan, Bruce 
Drew, Donald 
Durkin, James 
Flaherty, James 
Foster, Jesse 
Frobese, Ernest 
Galloway, Charles 
Gelineau, David 
Goode, Terrance 
Grenon, Richard 
Griffin, Anna 
Hadley, David 
Hadley, Jack 
Hadley, William 



POSITION 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Senior Clerk 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Junior Clerk 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS— 1989 



Vehicle Medical Mutual 

Auto Building Assistance Aid 



Invest. 



Outdoor 



Service 
Calls 



False 
Alarms 



Totals 



January 


6 


6 


43 





51 


9 


15 


3 


133 


February 


5 


9 


58 


1 


49 


7 


15 


4 


148 


March 


9 


5 


35 


4 


60 


16 


9 


8 


146 


April 


6 


2 


45 


— 


43 


31 


3 


27 


157 


May 


5 


5 


56 


2 


50 


13 


5 


39 


175 


June 


6 


4 


69 


1 


49 


6 


— 


30 


165 


July 


7 


6 


79 


1 


35 


9 


5 


39 


181 


August 


5 


2 


44 


1 


50 


5 


10 


60 


177 


September 


5 


2 


49 


— 


53 


2 


8 


41 


160 


October 


4 


4 


57 


— 


36 


2 


9 


34 


146 


November 


13 


7 


59 


— 


35 


9 


6 


29 


158 


December 


7 


8 


58 


- 


48 


3 


10 


29 


163 



Total 



78 



60 



652 



10 



559 



112 



95 



343 



1909 



67 



Hayes, Paul D. 
Henderson, Paul 
Houle, Henry 
Hughes, Robert 
Jamer, William 
Johnson, Peter 
Keeley, James 
Keohane, Dennis 
Keohane, William 
Kydd, Raymond 
Magiera, Emil 
Martin, Leo 
McTeague, Michael 
Merrill, Leslie 
Miller, Richard 
Miskell, Thomas 
Nolet, Edward 
O'Neil, Richard 
Reid, Daniel 
Reid, James 
Reid, John 
Ridlon, Michael 
Rivard, Arthur 
Robinson, John 
Schramm, Charles 
Sousa, James 
Spinazzola, Joseph 
Spinney, James 
Stanton, Brian 
Ubele, John D. 
Vaccaro, Anthony 
Vargeletis, Dennis 
Wetherbee, Peter 



Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Fire Chief 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 



The following roads were resurfaced with bituminous 
concrete: Locust Road (Entire Length); High Street (From 
Robin Hill Road to brook before Hunt Road); Smith Street 
(From Balsam Drive to brook); Parkhurst Road at Drum 
Hill Road; Dunstable Road (From Tyngsboro Line to 
Westford Line). 

Drainage: Drainage work this year consisted of easement 
cleaning in various areas of Town, pipe replacement and 
the repair or installation of numerous catch basins and 
manholes. 

This department has been incorporated into the new 
Department of Public Works. This will allow us to consol- 
idate and coordinate manpower and equipment in an 
orderly and timely fashion. 

Due to reductions in the budget, we were forced to 
eliminate a foreman's position. We want to thank Frederick 
"Rick" Dillon for his many years of dedicated service to the 
Town. 

I would also like to thank the men in the department 
for their cooperation throughout the year and to express 
my appreciation to other Town Departments for their help 
throughout the year. A special thanks goes to Pearl Koulas 
and Shirley Fletcher for all their extra time and effort in 
keeping the office running smoothly and to the Foremen, 
Bobby Lloyd and Roy Costa for all their help and advice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael A. Crory 

Supt. of Streets 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

I hereby respectfully submit my report of the Highway 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

The maintenance of all town streets was carried out in 
the usual manner. This includes street sweeping, basin 
cleaning and repairs, the cleaning of brooks, culverts and 
drainage easements, patching pot holes and washouts, 
replacement and erection of street signs, the painting of 
traffic lines and cross walks, guard rail repair, roadside 
mowing and brush trimming. In the winter months the 
department sanded, salted, snow plowed and removed snow 
when necessary, to insure safe travel for the public. 

The following roads were resurfaced with an oil and 
stone sealing: Cambridge Street, Mt. Auburn Street, Green 
Way, Belmont Drive, Roberts Street, South Row Street, Hall 
Road Ext., Parker Road, Fay Street, Green Valley Drive, 
Drew Circle, Tuttle Road, Proctor Road, Park Road, 
Greenacre Lane, Maple Road, Parkerville Road, Elm 
Street, Forrest Street, McFarlin Road, Donald Avenue, 
Lillian Avenue, Carleton Avenue, Sprague Avenue, Moore 
Street, Clarke Avenue. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review the Annual Report of the Police Department for the 
year 1989. 

At the present time, the department is made up of 55 
permanent officers. 

Chief of Police 
Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 
James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 

Captains 

Armand J. Caron John J. Mack 

Phillip N. Molleur 

Sergeants 

Leslie H. Adams Lance Cunningham 

Steven Burns John O. Walsh 

Raymond G. McCusker 



68 



Department Criminal Prosecutor- 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

Criminal Bureau 
Sergeant 

William R. McAllister 



Brian F. Mullen 
James F. Murphy 
Timothy F. O'Connor 



Inspectors 

Eugene W. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Drug/Alcohol Control Unit 

Sergeant 

Francis X. Roark 

Inspectors 

Jared S. Finnegan Roland E. Linstad 

Community Services & Safety Officer 
Patrick W Daley 

Crime Prevention Officer 

Joseph R. Gamache 

Juvenile Officer 

Kenneth R. Duane 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Paul E. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
James T. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd, III 
Daniel Houston 
Gail Hunter 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Krikorian 
Russell H. Linstad 
David MacKenzie 
John M. McGeown 
Peter C. McGeown 



Susan Boucher 
Deborah Clark 
Barbara Ducharme 
Donna Fox 



Patrolmen 

Debra Metcalf 
James F. Midgley 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
E. Michael. Rooney 
Mark St.Hilaire 
Michael M. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
Robert Villare 
William R. Walsh 



Matrons 

Karen Leonard 
Kimberly Martin 
Jo-Ann Molleur 



Principal Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Karen M. Leonard Jo-Ann Molleur 

Senior Clerk 
Mary Jane Grant 

Jr. Clerk 

Donna Fox 



Civilian Dispatchers 

Barbara Ducharme Frederick Flynn 

Brian Fernald Frank Lane 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1988 1989 

Photocopying Machine $4,525.00 $3,291.00 

Firearms Permit 3,910.00 4,733.00 

Bicycle Registrations 23.50 1.00 

Firearms Identification Cards 462.00 356.00 

Court Fines 226,083.50 245,882.50 

Photographs 788.00 708.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 27,767.69 43,191.07 

Miscellaneous 9,880.00 9,625.00 

Parking Fines 12,980.00 15,680.00 

Restitution 18,345.00 6,065.00 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town $304,764.69 $329,532.57 

ARRESTS 

1988 1989 

Crimes Against Persons 36 75 

Crimes Against Property 129 189 

Crimes Against Public Order 293 342 

DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1989 

1988 1989 

Fines 108 68 

Placed On Probation 19 34 

Suspended Sentence & Placed on 

Probation 8 12 

Placed On File 38 73 

Not Guilty Finding 3 

Dismissed With Probable Cause 4 4 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs & 

Continued Without A Finding 7 38 

Committed to Youth Services Board .... 3 5 

Committed to M.C.I. Cedar Junction . .0 2 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to House of Correction, 

Billerica 22 16 

Turned Over to Other P.D.'s & Courts .55 103 

Cases Pending & Continued in Court . 170 216 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program .... 19 20 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1988 1989 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 10,689 13,187 

Summons Served 643 717 

Licenses Suspended or Revoked 300 293 

Accidents Reported 1,791 1,479 

Personal Injury Accidents 475 273 

Fatal Accidents 2 3 

Mileage on Cruisers 485,434 475,416 

Special Property Checks 

(Aux. Police) 34,800 33,700 

Station Lockups 513 606 

Citations Issued 5,858 4,545 

Parking Violations 998 1,329 

Doors & Windows Found Open 69 69 

Detoxification Unit 80 83 

Restraining Orders Served 71 






69 



CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

For the first time, the department is now employing 
Civilian Radio Dispatchers. At this time, we have two 
dispatchers appointed on a full-time basis and two dispat- 
chers appointed part-time. Subsequently, all will be ap- 
pointed full-time. This concept should reflect a con- 
siderable savings to the department. 

FIREARMS CONVERSION 

In the interests of enhanced safety and increased 
firepower, the department has converted over from .357 
magnum revolvers to 9 Milimeter, 15 shot semi-automatic. 

911 

The 911 Emergency Telephone System has been install- 
ed at the police station and all 911 emeregency calls in the 
town are now facilitated by the police radio dispatcher. The 
system is working very well. 

COLOR GUARD 

An 8 Officer Color Guard Unit has been undertaken 
within the department and judging by appearances thus 
far at police and other official town functions, funerals, 
parades, etc., the unit is proving to be a credit to both, 
the department and the town. 

COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

The installation of a state-of-the-art communication 
center in the radio room was finalized this past year and 
served to enhance communications in general, safety and 
the concept of professionalism. 

PARKING LOT PAVING 

Finalized the paving of the department parking lot in 
its entirety. This will prove to be a cost-effective move in 
the long-term. 

The efforts of this department served to generate the sum 
of $329,532.57 which reverted back into the general fund 
of the Town. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen and all town officials, departments, 
and committees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
Police Department and also congratulate all police and 
civilian personnel of this department for once again, main- 
taining their high performance standards. 

Sincerely, 

Raymond P. McKeon 
Chief of Police 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

This past year the Auxiliary continued to expand our 
training program for our officers. All Auxiliary Officers 
have been recruited in CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscita- 
tion) First Aid and Firearms. The unit had seven officers 
graduate from the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Train- 
ing Council Reserve Officers Academy in Tewksbury. This 



past year, Auxiliary Officers assisted the town at numerous 
events such as the Early Bird Road Race, Memorial Day 
Parade, Flag Day Ceremonies, Middlesex County Kennel 
Club Dog Show, Oddessy of the Mind (McCarthy School), 
Town Clean Up Day, Chelmsford High School Graduation 
exercises, July 3rd festivities, July 4th Parade, Vietnam 
Veterans Day, Halloween, and Thanksgiving Football 
security for the schools, Chelmsford Elks Carnival and 
Lazer Show. The Explorer Scouts and the Auxiliary assisted 
the regular department with a search for a lost child in 
the Chelmsford Town Forest. 

Operation House Check was in operation on 310 nights. 
The statistics were: vacant house checks 5,100; school 
checks 10,660; town property checks 17,940 for a total of 
33,700. The men and women of the Auxiliary over the last 
year have donated to the town a total of 17,307 man hours 
performing their duties. The Auxiliary continues to spon- 
sor the Explorer Scout Law Enforcement Post #370 and we 
assist them with training and planning their activities. The 
young men and women of the post have assisted the Aux- 
iliary at every event and I would like to thank them for 
all their help over the past year. The Auxiliary Officers 
assisted the department with the sewer construction details 
for traffic control. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary and 
their families for donating so much of their time to make 
Chelmsford a better place to live. I would like to thank the 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager for their sup- 
port, the Chief and Deputy Chiefs and the Officers of the 
Police Department for their assistance and support over 
the past year, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 

Auxiliary Roster 

Director— Sgt. Raymond C. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Mike Beaudoin 
William Beaumont 
John Bell 
Joseph Eriksen 
George Fetzer 
Eric Gordon 
David Irvine 
David Leo 
Kim Martin 
Steven Manning 
Daniel McLarney 
Erick Merrill 
John Oczkowski 



Auxiliary Officers 

Bradford Poole 
Edward Quinn 
James Quinn 
Ralph Roscoe 
Kevin Ross 
John Roberts 
James Spinney 
Michael Taplin 
William Tessier 
David Tyler 
William Vaughn 
Steven Vowels 
Craig Walsh 



70 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford, I am submitting the annual report 
of activities of this department as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year of 1989. 

Veterans' Benefits is a state mandated organization duly 
authorized under Chapter 115, MGL Section 1 through 5. 
Two valued services are provided. One pertains to assistance 
with federal benefits under the Veterans' Administration, 
the other to financially aid and give assistance to qualified 
veterans and their dependents under Veterans' Benefits. 

The Cash and Material Grant of $53,000.00 from the 
Town of Chelmsford is reimbursed 75% by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. On a state level my case load 
varies between 22 and 28 families. 

The Town of Chelmsford's Health Benefits Coordinator 
is Roberta K. Doukszewicz. She is responsible for the record 
keeping of all active and retired employees who carry any 
of the town medical insurance plans. Additional duties in- 
clude: keeping record of monies received from Teachers 
Retirement Board and adding, deleting, changing mem- 
bers policies as needed. Analyzing the town's monthly 
medical statements and paying premiums to all insurance 
carriers. Also, collecting and distributing monthly data to 
Blue Cross Blue Shield and HMO insurance consultants. 
Ms. Doukszewicz's office is now in the Veterans Services 
Department. 

The Veterans' Agent has also assumed the duties of 
Employee Assistance Program Counselor and Substance 
Abuse Program Counselor. 

Presently, I serve as Vice-Chairman of the Auditing and 
Finance Committee for the Massachusetts Veterans' Agent 
Association. Also, I serve on the Executive Board. I con- 
tinue to be active with Middlesex County Veterans' Agents 
association and hold membership in American Society of 
Notaries. I wish to express my appreciation to town Of- 
ficials, "Spirit of Christmas," American Legion Posts 212 
and 313 and other civic organizations for their continued 
cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe, LSW 
Certified Veterans' Agent 



BOARD OF APPEALS 
ANNUAL REPORT 1989 

Members 

Robert Kydd, Chairman 
Gustave Fallgren, Vice Chairman 
Daniel Burke, Clerk 
Eileen Duffy 
Harold Organ, Jr. 



Robert Scharn 



Alternates 

Karen Wharton 

Secretary 

Marjorie Hennessy 



Ronald Pare 



Hearing Statistics: 

Variances 
Special Permits 
Comprehensive Permits 

Total 



Total 

67 

27 



94 



Granted Denied Withdrawn 

52 13 2 

20 7 





72 



20 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the 
members of the Board for their efforts over the past year. 
It has been a pleasure serving with this group. I would also 
like to thank Town Manager Bernie Lynch, the Board of 
Selectmen, Town Counsel Jim Harrington, Town Engineer 
Jim Pearson and all the other Town Boards for their 
cooperation during the year of 1989. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Kydd, Chairman 



CHELMSFORD COMMISSION ON 
HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

The Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 
accomplished a great deal in 1989. A town-wide survey on 
disability-related issues was conducted in early 1989 and 
results tabulated. The data collected will enable the com- 
mission to focus efforts on the specific needs of Chelmsford 
residents. 

The commission actively pursued the accessibility of 
publicly-used buildings and this crucial task will be an 
ongoing process. 

The commission's seven members are: Paul Logan, chair- 
man; Ralph Hickey, treasurer; Cathy Favreau, secretary; 
Alice Beauvais, Nancy Desjardins, Carol Miller and Mary 
St.Hilaire. Long-time member and former chairman 
Regina Wojcik resigned in late 1989 and received thanks 
from the board for her hard work. 



Thank you, 

Paul M. Logan 
Chairman, C.C.H.A. 



71 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

ANNUAL REPORT 

1989 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilities 


Exp. 


W. Robert Greenwood 


Chairman 


1991 


David J. McLachlan 


Clerk & Wetlands 


1990 


Karen G. Flynn 


Wetlands 


1992 


Charles Galloway 


Reservation Mgt. 


1991 


James H. McBride 


Wetlands 


1992 


John D. Scott 


Treasurer & Wetlands 


1991 


John Droescher 


Wetlands 


1990 


Marjorie Hennessy 


Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and desirable 
aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the time 
and effort of the Commission members. A total of nine- 
teen public hearings were held this year in accordance with 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued eighteen Orders of Conditions and 
denied one. Twenty-one hearings were also held for Deter- 
mination of Applicability of the Wetlands Protection Act 
and eighteen Negative and two Positive Determinations 
were issued. One was continued. 

Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the pro- 
tection of the Town's wetland areas. Cooperation between 
Town Boards has enabled the Commission to inform a 
developer at the beginning stages of the development that 
a filing with the Commission would be necessary. This helps 
to avoid costly and unnecessary expenses on the part of 
the town and the developer. 

Work continues at the Wright Reservation. The new 
parking lot has been built and the granite sign has been 
installed. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

1989 was a historic year for the Council on Aging and 
the Town of Chelmsford for it marked the opening of a 
beautiful new Senior Center. From the formation of a study 
committee in 1984 to the ribbon -cutting ceremony on Oc- 
tober 27, 1989 the commitment and desire was admirable. 
For all of Chelmsford's residents it was a joyous accomplish- 
ment. While today's older citizens will benefit immediate- 
ly, the legacy will affect many generations to come. 

The Council on Aging wishes to acknowledge the fine 
work of the Friends of the Senior Center for its major con- 
tribution in making this building a reality. During the past 



three years a massive effort was made to raise money for 
furnishing and support services. The results of this deter- 
mination and effort were the realization of over $150,000. 
All of the monies raised were and will be put directly into 
the building for its enhancement and upkeep. The new 
Center is a proud accomplishment for the Town and the 
pride should be shared by all. Our older citizens provided 
the desire and dedication to purpose, but it could not have 
been achieved without true community spirit and generosi- 
ty. ..and to this reality we are thankful to all. 

Submitted by 

Martin J. Walsh, Director 
for the Chelmsford C.O.A. 

Members of the C.O.A. 

Annette Holtzman, Chairperson 

Robert Clough, Vice Chairperson 

Hazel Emerson, Secretary 

Verne Woodward, Treasurer 

C. Wilbur Davis 

Howard Moore 

Franchon Larson 

Jean Mark 

Ashton Ricker 

Fern Ricker 

Kathleen McDonald 

Directors of the Friends of the Senior Center 

Donna Johnson, President 

Helen Palmgren, Treasurer 

Annette Holtzman, Clerk 

Robert Clough 

Howard Moore 

Gene Raby 

Joseph Shanahan, Jr. 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members — Members — 

Jan. 1-June, 1989 Sept., 1989 

Eric Hoover, Chairman Eric Hoover, Chairman 

Bette Gagnon, Vice Chairman Bette Gagnon, Vice Chairman 

Sandy Stewich, Secretary Sandy Stewich, Secretary 

Jim Turcotte, Treasurer 
Eleanor Bragdon 
Karen Leonard 
Joyce McKenzie 
Evelyn Newman 
Jeffrey Brem 



Jim Turcotte, Treasurer 
Flavia Cigliano 
Pat Fitzpatrick 
Eleanor Bragdon 
Marion Gould 
Karen Leonard 



MEETINGS: 

1st Monday of the Month 

Twice a month during Arts Lottery reviews 

The principal function of the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is to administer funds allocated to the Town of 
Chelmsford by the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council. 
Twice annually, grant applications are available to non- 



72 



profit cultural organizations for projects benefiting the 
Chelmsford community. 

In 1989 thirty-two grant proposals were either partially 
or fully funded by the Cultural Council. Grant applica- 
tions ranged from individuals who received funds to under- 
write the publication of Chelmsford's history or an original 
play to large groups undertaking townwide productions. 

Another facet of the Mass. Arts Lottery funding is 
P. A.S.S. (Performing Arts Students' Series). This program 
provides funds for the public school students of the Town 
to attend performing arts events. Initiated in November, 
1986, the program is increasing in popularity with both 
elementary and secondary teachers taking advantage of the 
funds to attend musical and theatrical events with their 
students. 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is also closely involv- 
ed with the functioning of the Old Town Hall that serves 
as Chelmsford's Cultural Center. Numerous town-based 
organizations are the Hall for special events or for regular 
rehearsals and meetings. 

Other accomplishments this year include a Cultural 
Assessment Survey with the development of a Cultural Plan 
and the purchase of a new Cultural Events changeable copy 
sign to be used by any cultural organization having a func- 
tion at the Old Town Hall. The Council also particpated 
in the anri&al convention of statewide arts councils. 

Heartfelt thanks were extended to Flavia Cigliano, 
Marion Gould and Pat Fitzpatrick for having served 6 years 
on the Council. The resignation of Eric Hoover was regret- 
fully accepted. 

In addition to continuing the projects above, in 1990 the 
Chelmsford Cultural Council will hold an Open Forum for 
the benefit of Arts Lottery Applicants to assist them in 
writing grants in accordance with State requirements. A 
brochure, explaining the function of the Arts Lottery Coun- 
cil will be made available to the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 



The Chelmsford Recreation Commission is appointed by 
the Town Manager. The Commission is responsible for 
developing, administering and supporting programs and 
facilities designed to fill the recreation needs of the residents 
of the Town. 

The major portion of the Commission's activities is con- 
nected with organized youth activities. The Commission 
provides very limited funding for these activities 

Participation in the Recreation Summer Program con- 
tinues to increase with the following activities being offered 
through the Summer months: 

Outside and inside basketball, tennis lessons, playground 
programs at Varney Playground, Westlands, South Row 
and Byam Schools, swimming and swimming lessons at 
Freeman Lake, and track and field activity at High 
School track. Our WOW Wednesdays, a six week series 
of free entertainment for children, continues to be very 
well attended. 

The first annual Activities Fair was held June, 89 at 
McCarthy Middle School. This enabled parents to register 
for all Summer events in one place at one time. This in- 
cluded all Sports Clinics and Camps taking place during 
the Summer months. The large response was a surprise, 
and as is the case in most firsts, we saw areas where im- 
provements could be made. These improvements have been 
made and we look forward to 1990 Activities Fair being 
another successful event. 

Club 365 is a year round activities club for children with 
special needs. In August of 1989, Recreation sponsored a 
1 week integrated Day Camp which was held at Varney 
Playground in North Chelmsford. This was such a success 
that Club 365 would like to expand this Day Camp longer 
than one week in 1990. 

Our Summer Brochure is distributed each year through 
the schools in Town. This brochure gives a complete calen- 
dar of activities, listing all programs and sports clinics tak- 
ing place in summer. These brochures are also available 
at the libraries and in the Town Offices. They are 
distributed toward the end of the school year. 

Chelmsford residents are now enjoying the new soccer 
fields at Mill Road and the new lighted Southwell com- 
plex in North Chelmsford. 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Ron Zylich 
Robert Hayes 
Michael Ablove 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 
Joan Murray 
Evelyn Newman 
Dennis Sullivan 
Lorraine Murphy 



MEMBERS 

Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Clerk 



VETERANS' 
EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

This is the Forty- Second report of the Veteran's Emergen- 
cy Fund Committee. The fund was established in 1947 by 
a Town Meeting vote at which time the funds were accepted 
from a town committee which was active during World War 
II and which sold surplus materials. It was understood at 
that time that the fund would be administered by a com- 
mittee of World War II Veterans, and would be used for 



73 



their benefit in the years ahead. Each year a veteran is ap- 
pointed by the Selectmen to represent each of the voting 
precincts. 

The present balance of the fund which is comprised of 
a Savings Account and two Term Deposit Certificate Ac- 
counts is $14,456.33. 

During the calendar year of 1989 no applications for 
assistance were received by the committee. In most cases 
in the past applications are first received and investigated 
by the Veteran's Agent, after which the committee studies 
the needs of the applicant. 

There was a change in membership of the committee 
during 1989. Mr. Melvin dejager, a member for a con- 
siderable length of time, was unable to continue his 
membership from Precinct 9. We now wish to acknowledge 
his service to the Town and for his assistance in the past. 

Assistance is always in the form of material grants such 
as payments for rent, fuel, utilities, medical needs and 
clothing. 

Our present committee members are listed as follows: 



Precinct 1: 
Precinct 2: 
Precinct 3: 
Precinct 4: 
Precinct 5: 
Precinct 6: 
Precinct 7: 
Precinct 8: 
Precinct 9: 



Russell E. Starck 
Russell E. Butterfield 
James J. Walker 
John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Robert T Clough 
Thomas F. Balfrey 
Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1st, 1989 through December 31st, 1989 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1989: $13,424.40 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 218.55 

The Comfed Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 353.76 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 479.62 

Total Interest Received: 1,031.93 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1989 and Receipts:. . 14,456.33 

Deduct Disbursements None 

Balance on Hand as of December Slst, 1989 14,456.33 

ASSSETS 

Central Savings Bank 

Account No. 128790 4,085.08 

Comfed Savings Bank 

Account No. 4574000012 4,394.28 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank 

Account No. 440007431 5,976.97 

Total Assets 14,456.33 

Total Liabilities None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities $14,456.33 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



The committee members extend their appreciation to 
the various town officers, the Veteran's Agent and staff, and 
to other town employees who have helped the committee 
in the past. 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 79 

Appointed Town Officials 57 

Board of Appeals 70 

Board of Assessors 38 

Board of Health 39 

Board of Registrars 45 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Cemetery Commission 38 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 70 

Conservation Commission 71 

Council on Aging 71 

Cultural Council 71 

Elected Town Officials 37 

Fire Department , 66 

General Information 2 

Highway Department 67 

Housing Authority 40 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 41 

Personnel Board 42 

Planning Board 44 

Police Department 67 

Police— Auxiliary 69 

Public Libraries 44 

School Committee 47 

Sewer Commission 56 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 57 

Town Accountant 58 

Town Clerk 5 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 4 and April 24, 1989 6 

Annual Town Elections Results 7 

Annual Town Meeting— April 24, 1989 8 

Special Town Meeting— April 24, 1989 8 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— April 24, 1989 11 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— May 1, 1989 16 

Representative Town Meeting Members 35 

Informational Orientation Meeting for Representative Town Meeting Members 35 

Special Town Meeting— October 12, 1989 30 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Town Manager 4 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 57 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 72 

Veterans' Services 70 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS Willi YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please 
fill our this form and mail to: Executive Secretary, Board of Selectmen, 
Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out 
of this form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE. . . . 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 250-5215 

Assessors: 250-5220 

Board of Appeals: 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Building Inspector: 250-5225 

(Yard Sales, Kennel & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery: 250-5245 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 
Conservation Commission: 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 
Dog Officer: 256-0754 
Fire Department: 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business: 250-5265 
Gas Inspector: 250-5225 
Health Department: 250-5241 
Highway Department: 250-5270 

Garage: 250-5271 
High School: 251-8729 
Housing Authority: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams: 256-5521 
McKay: 251-3212 
Mass. Electric Co.: 458-1431 
Park Dept. Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 250-5231 
Plumbing Inspector: 250-5225 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office (Center): 256-2361 
Recreation Commission: 250-5262 

(8:30 am-12:30 pm) 
Registry of Deeds (Lowell):458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Administration: 251-4981 
Selectmen: 250-5201 
Sewer Commission: 250-5233 
Supt. of Public Bldgs: 250-5249 
Town Clerk: 250-5205 
Town Engineer: 250-5228 
Treasurer/Tax Collector: 250-5210 
Veterans' Agent: 250-5238 
Water Dept: 256-2381 
Welcome Wagon: 663-4030 
Welfare (Lowell): 454-8061 
Wiring Inspector: 250-5225 
24-hr. Junior Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 

Boston, MA 02116 

362 Russell Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Chester G. Atkins 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, DC. 20515 
Lowell no. 459-0101 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Ave., Chelmsford 

256-5043 

Middlesex County Commissioners 
Superior Courthouse 494-4100 
East Cambridge, MA 02141